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The way seasons work in A Song of Ice and Fire is very peculiar, so I was wondering if it's even possible for a real planet to have an orbit/axes/rotation that would account for it? For example, winters are said to be able to last multiple years. Winter on Earth is caused by the tilt in Earth's axis, so that at certain points in Earth's orbit, the part of the planet experiencing winter is farther away from the sun, but logically this means any planet has winter due to the same phenomenon would always have a winter that is approximately a quarter of its year long. Furthermore, winter in A Song of Ice and Fire is highly variable in length and seemingly unpredictable. Since the seasons seem to last so long, perhaps it could be because their calendar years don't actually correlate with the length of their planet's orbit, which could be very long?

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  • Not exactly no. I was looking for not an in-universe explanation (I was expecting that answer is "magic did it") but more if there could be a real planet that has these conditions. I expect the answer is probably no, though.
    – Kai
    Jan 1, 2020 at 22:10
  • In that case, the question should be closed for a different reason; Off-topic because... This question does not appear to be about science fiction or fantasy
    – Valorum
    Jan 1, 2020 at 22:15
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    Hmm... ambiguous to me. "Questions seeking scientific solutions or explanations are off-topic unless related directly to a cited work of fiction. There are several other Stack Exchange sites dedicated to answering questions on non-fictional sciences. For more information, see What is our actual policy on science questions? on meta."
    – FuzzyBoots
    Jan 1, 2020 at 22:16
  • @FuzzyBoots - OP isn't asking in relation to a work of fiction. Stripped of its context, it's just "Can you replicate an erratic seasonal pattern in an orbital simulator"
    – Valorum
    Jan 1, 2020 at 22:18

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