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Has there ever been shown in Star Wars (canon or Legends, but canon preferably) a lightsaber where the emitter can move position? That is to say, that the 'head' of the lightsaber is hinged or in some other way can be moved to change the angle of the blade relative to the handle? I know that there is an example of a saber staff that hinges in the middle, however I'm more interested in cases where the moving component is as close to the blade as possible.

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Inquisitor Lightsaber

The Inquisitor Lightsaber from Star Wars: Rebels

I'm not sure if you'll count this as hinged, but it can certainly move the angle of the blade. In fact, it's a hand-held General Grievous, being capable of spinning in circles.

The hilt stays in position while the blade itself spins around the edge of the circle, which suggests the emitter is not directly attached to the hilt.

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Lightwhip

There is the lightwhip... whose name says it all ha. It was introduced as Canon in September 2019 (Gadgets and Gear). Image is taken from a Legends comic.

Their internal workings permit the plasma blades' containment field to be pliable, thus allowing for dozens of small emitters to create thin and flexible blades that could reach several meters in length. Lightwhips' blades were weaker than a typical lightsaber's, and as such had limited cutting capabilities. However, whips were able to capture or entangle opponents.

That's about as 'hinged' or independent from handle as it gets!

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    That is terrible. – Buzz Jan 21 at 0:02
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    Maybe the writers were unhinged too ;) – Ron Jan 21 at 1:15
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    The writers must have been on Death Sticks when they made that canon lol – Gertsen Jan 21 at 8:41
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    That's a weird bit of equipment! I've accepted the other answer as I was more interested in the emitter itself being able to move (as opposed to the emitter being static and the blade being flexible), but this is still a great answer – Psycrow Jan 21 at 13:02
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    @Ron: My understanding is that the Fantasy Flight Games stuff is only quasi-canonical; they've held the Star Wars license since before the Disney buyout of LucasFilm and the subsequent shift of the EU to "Legends". Their own material (even today) isn't purely canon, and to my knowledge the actual Story Group has yet to grant full canon status. Until some official source mentions it, the lightwhip is game-legal, but not canon. Members of the story group have stopped just shy of calling FFG sourcebooks canon. – ShadowRanger Jan 22 at 3:07

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