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Where are the warp nacelles on the ST: Picard warp Romulan ships?

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None are visible in this picture.

Another:
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This is a Klingon BOP:

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I remember hearing that Ferengi Marauders placed their warp coils in the main hull itself--but then, wouldn't the crew and ship be subject to intense and potentially fatal radiation?

Borg cubes had nothing like nacelles either.

So where are the warp nacelles on non-Federation ships, and how do they achieve warp flight without them?

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    It might be too much to expect consistency from this new wave of "Star Trek" content. – Harabeck May 13 '20 at 18:32
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    @Harabeck True, but I'm looking for an in-universe, canonical answer. – Sovereign Inquiry May 13 '20 at 21:38
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This is addressed in the tie-in Klingon Bird of Prey Owners' Workshop Manual. In short, Klingon vessels from the 22nd century onwards haven't used warp coils but rather warp wings, flat plates that are energised to create a warp field around the ship. These have the benefit of being much less prone to leaking radiation that might reveal the presence of a cloaked ship.

The Bird-of-Prey achieves warp flight using a different system of energized alloys from other ships in the IKDF fleet. Most civilizations that are capable of faster than light travel use circular or oval rings of space-bending metals and composites. The familiar ’warp coils’—housed in stand-off nacelles or incorporated within a starship hull—warp space and provide propulsion when they are exposed to high energy plasma. Early Klingon, Vulcan, and Romulan vessels used this system to make their way through interstellar space, employing a variety of cryogenic fuels and antimatter to achieve greater and greater speeds and distances. While plasma reactions had originally been triggered directly within the nacelles, advances in pumping super hot plasma from remote—and protected—engines allowed for larger, more powerful systems. Magnetically lined conduits could be routed through different ship structures. Crystalline materials such as ikemenite, faslonite, and dilithium became standards for regulating the furious energies and smoothing out the plasma frequencies within the core. Design engineers within the Imperial Klingon Defense Forces, with ship commanders taking an active role in deciding what systems were to be installed in their ships, experimented early in the 22nd century with reshaping the usual nacelle configuration for new classes of fast, stealthy attack vessels. It was determined that the sequential energizing of warp alloys did not necessarily require the ‘coils’ to be coils at all, but the alloys could be compacted into flat sheets. Beginning with Klingon vessels of the 2120s, the energized warp wing was born, leading to the development of the 23rd-century B'rel-class Bird-of-Prey with its imposing bird shape. In the B'rel-class, plasma produced in the twin warp cores is allowed to fill and pressurize the central horizontal conduits that lead to the wings, through penetrations in the engineering hull on Deck 5. Each central conduit has a variable aperture duct, which works in concert with the wing hinge to provide different amounts and pressures of plasma to the warp system depending on the flight mode—liftoff/landing, cruise, and attack.

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warp nacelles are usually a federation, klingon and romulan thing some other races also use them too. the vast majority of alien ship designs don't use the warp nacelle method. the borg, bajoran and cardassian also don't use the nacelle method either and many alien designs as seen throughout the many series.

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    This doesn't really address how warp flight is achieved without them – Valorum May 13 '20 at 19:19
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    Some Bajoran ships don't even need engines to go to warp (DS9 - the episode where Sisko and Jake fly the light ship) – SpacePhoenix May 13 '20 at 19:42
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    @Valorum I actually should edit my question to include how warp flight is achieved without nacelles. – Sovereign Inquiry May 14 '20 at 14:29
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    @SpacePhoenix What do you mean? – Sovereign Inquiry May 14 '20 at 14:31
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    @user67368 Bajorans actually did use warp nacelles for some of their ships, but most used wing-like designs for warp travel. – Sovereign Inquiry May 14 '20 at 14:33
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When the original and TNG startrek was made, Roddenberry was adament ships needed two nacelles in line of sight of one another for the Warp field to work. Chief designer Rick Sternbach followed that perspective for every ship he designed. The only logical place the nacelles could be for the other warbird. It also stands to assume they follow a different architecture. enter image description here

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    I'm at a loss why you've drawn red circles around the primary impulse drive – Valorum May 13 '20 at 19:22
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    Most likely the warp nacelles are imbedded in those pylons. – LazyReader May 13 '20 at 19:25
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    @LazyReader If there were warp nacelles at all, they wouldn't be embedded in anything at all--they'd be exposed outside the hull. – Sovereign Inquiry May 13 '20 at 21:37

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