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I'm trying to find an example of Frodo's cloak's effectiveness. I dimly remember reading an occasion when Frodo is trying to sleep, cold and vulnerable. It's a passive use, where the cloak works 'as needed', this time to keep Frodo warm.

  • Are you asking if it has some sort of magic warmth property, in addition to acting as a normal cloak would? As in the quote in @Edlothiad's answer, Sam is just adding another layer of clothing to keep Frodo warmer, just as anyone with much experience of the outdoors would. – jamesqf Jun 19 at 3:28
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    @jamesqf, the question was edited from a scene/quote identification to a different question. There was no particular interest in magical, or not, properties. Adding another layer would, however, not normally make one feel lighter. – Edlothiad Jun 19 at 7:04
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You might be remembering this scene in Mordor as Sam and Frodo start on their crossing after coming down from the Tower of Cirith Ungol

He shivered a little. 'What I really need is something warm,' he said. 'It's gone cold, or else I've caught a chill.'
'You can have my cloak, Mr. Frodo,' said Sam. He unslung his pack and took out the elvencloak. 'How's this, Mr. Frodo?' he said. 'You wrap that orc-rag close round you, and put the belt outside it. Then this can go over all. It don't look quite orc-fashion, but it'll keep you warmer; and I daresay it'll keep you from harm better than any other gear. It was made by the Lady.'
Frodo took the cloak and fastened the brooch. 'That's better!' he said. 'I feel much lighter. I can go on now
The Return of the King, Book VI: Chapter 2, The Land of the Shadow

The only other mention of the cloaks' warmth is in the initial description from the "leader of the Elves"

But they should serve you well: they are light to wear, and warm enough or cool enough at need. And you will find them a great aid in keeping out of the sight of unfriendly eyes, whether you walk among the stones or the trees.
The Fellowship of the Ring, Book II: Chapter 8, Farewell to Lórien

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    "warm enough or cool enough at need." This is pretty true of just a normal medieval cloak. – Shufflepants Jun 19 at 4:21
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    I'd always assumed, when I read that, that it was an excellent quality cloak, but non-magical. – NomadMaker Jun 19 at 4:32
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    @NomadMaker, I’m not sure where, in either my answer or the original question, you’re getting the notion that it must be magical from. Certainly no ordinary cloak would render you effectively invisible, but that point is moot in this Q&A. – Edlothiad Jun 19 at 7:03
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    I think the author's intention is to convey that the Lorien elves are "being coy" about whether the gear they make is magical. Or at least, while the elves don't consider it "magical", just correctly made, the hobbits and the reader certainly would. For example, the rope that Sam and Frodo used to descend a cliff coming untied when Sam gives it a wistful tug at the thought of leaving such a fine piece of workmanship behind. – Doug Warren Jun 19 at 20:08
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    @Shufflepants Magic in Tolkien's world doesn't usually work the same way as it does in Harry Potter. There are some special cases - such as Gadalf and the other Wizards and other Maia, and maybe a couple of other times such as Galadriel's mirror or the river washing away the Nazgul. But, most of the time, magic in Middle Earth just means that something is very, very good or very, very evil. A cloak made by the Elves would just be very comfortable and very warm, same way as bread made by the Elves is very filling and tasty. But there wouldn't be any woo that comes with the warmth. – Misha R Jun 19 at 23:57
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I can't find a specific mention of using the cloak to stay warm when sleeping, but while they are walking through Mordor, Frodo has to remove much of his armour and heavy gear due to his fatigue. He mentions being cold, and Sam gives Frodo his cloak, implying that it will keep him warm.

‘What I really need is something warm,’ he said. ‘It’s gone cold, or else I’ve caught a chill.’ [...]

‘You can have my cloak, Mr. Frodo,’ said Sam. He unslung his pack and took out the elven-cloak. ‘How’s this, Mr. Frodo?’ he said. ‘You wrap that orc-rag close round you, and put the belt outside it. Then this can go over all. It don’t look quite orc-fashion, but it’ll keep you warmer; and I daresay it’ll keep you from harm better than any other gear. It was made by the Lady.’

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