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In OotP, Battle of the Department of Mysteries, Neville's mouth is injured, which prevents him from talking clearly. He mumbles several things, some are discernible while others are not.For example :

'Longbottom?'repeated Bellatrix, and a truly evil smile lit her gaunt face.'Why I have had the pleasure of meeting your parents,boy'

'I DOE YOU HAB',roared Neville...

Like the above example, Neville mumbles many other things. On these occasions , what is he trying to say ? What does he mean ?

  • 3
    "I know you have." Neville has a cold, and a stopped up nose. – JRE Jul 25 at 6:10
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    He doesn't have a cold. He's nose is bleeding – TheMadHatter Jul 25 at 6:21
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    It was a guess from the way it was written. I've never read any of the Harry Potter books. I mean, it's plain enough what he's saying and the usual reason people "talk" that way is because of a stopped up nose - usually from a cold. – JRE Jul 25 at 6:25
  • The french translation is "I know it well" – Valorum Jul 25 at 7:53
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"I know you have had!" is what he tried to say, defiantly and angrily. His nose is full of blood and his mouth is injured.

Edit:As mentioned below, "have" can more easily change to "hab" as compared to "had" changing to "hab".

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  • 3
    Personally I think it's "I know you have [had]" - it sounds more idiomatic. – marcellothearcane Jul 25 at 6:51
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    ^ agreed: he's able to say "d" normally, so it wouldn't become "b". – Rand al'Thor Jul 25 at 7:06
  • @Randal'Thor Then why didn't he actually say "had"? Unless the word "have" makes more sense than the word "had" inherently. But if so then you don't need to resort to the fact that he could have said "d"; you could just say that the word was "have" because that's more sensible. – Alex Jul 26 at 1:45
  • @Alex I mentioned that as another piece of evidence to support marcello's comment that "have" makes more sense idiomatically. – Rand al'Thor Jul 26 at 4:59

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