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Admiral Ackbar: Although the weapon systems on this Death Star are not yet operational, the Death Star does have a strong defense mechanism. It is protected by an energy shield which is generated from the nearby forest moon of Endor. The shield must be deactivated if any attack is to be attempted. Once the shield is down, our cruisers will create a perimeter while the fighters fly into the superstructure and attempt to knock out the main reactor.

What is the use of creating perimeter after shield is down?

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    the shield protects the Death Star II, the perimeter protects the Rebel fighters – NKCampbell Nov 13 '20 at 16:03
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The Death Star isn't just a superlaser, it's also a large scale Imperial base. There were some ships (like Star Destroyers) contained inside. The full plan that Ackbar was describing here was a surprise attack, so it was supposed to go something like this

  1. The Endor squad takes down the shield just before the main force arrives
  2. The Rebel ships jump in and catch the confused Death Star troops unaware
  3. A perimeter would then be established to contain the exiting Imperial ships and fighters
  4. Rebel ships enter the Death Star and blow it up

Remember, they don't know there's hundreds of Imperial ships already outside the Death Star ready to move in once they arrive. As it turns out, this part of the plan was unused and once the shield went down only a handful of Tie fighters even noticed the Rebel ships going in.

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    I disagree, and instead agree with NKCambell’s comment on the question. Creating a perimeter in this sense would be used to protect the attacking fighters from being attacked from behind by an external fleet coming to the rescue of the Death Star II. A “cordon” would be designed to contain exiting ships. – RLH Nov 13 '20 at 16:37
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    @RLH I'm not contradicting NKCampbell in any way. A perimeter would allow them to establish control of the area surrounding the Death Star (i.e. stop Tie fighters trying to stop the Rebel fighters from entering). Again, as far as they knew, the only real threats to the plan were inside the Death Star itself. – Machavity Nov 13 '20 at 16:49
  • A perimeter in this sense stops things from coming into a region from outside, which is different from a cordon/blockade to stop things from leaving an enclosed region. The plan was to guard against external help, not a fleet docked inside what was believed to be a construction site. – RLH Nov 13 '20 at 16:56
  • has my upvote : ) - I don't think the question is quite a duplicate but this seems related and may give some insight - scifi.stackexchange.com/questions/150150/… – NKCampbell Nov 13 '20 at 17:13
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    I think it’s both. I always assumed the perimeter was to defend the rear of the fighters as they enter and destroy the reactor. But it also makes sense that the perimeter additionally prevents the launching of more ships and fighters and also attacks the Death Star defenses. – Todd Wilcox Nov 13 '20 at 17:47

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