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So far the science experiments of Senku and co. have been scientifically correct, as the materials and elements are nonfictional (unless there was something there that was and I didn't know about it).

Has there been something people have barely missed in the current anime episodes and manga till the current chapter that is surprisingly fictional?

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    Is the question just about the experiments/science that the group does? So, excluding the whole "turn people into stone", the sheer strength of some people, and other backstory elements?
    – shufly
    Nov 30, 2020 at 4:44
  • @shufly it can be anything in the series, as long as it cannot be fully explained by science, or only partially explained Nov 30, 2020 at 16:01

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The whole "petrification beam that turns people into stone, keeps them on suspended animation for several thousand years, and heals all injuries" concept that the story is based around is clearly fictional. We don't know how to replicate most of that with even theoretical science.

The A.I. on the International Space Station is more advanced than anything we can make right now.

Also, the recent manga chapters indicate that apparently

there is someone living on the moon that is behind the original stone beam, and they may or may not be nonhuman (i.e., aliens). Sapient aliens aren't impossible, but we don't know of any right now.

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  • Is the AI on the space station a manga-only thing? I don't remember it being particularly remarkable, or even being there in the first place (or maybe I just forgot it).
    – lfurini
    Jan 29, 2021 at 7:15
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    @Ifurini It's in the Dr. Stone prequel manga Dr. STONE reboot: Byakuya (which isn't actually a reboot, just a prequel). Don't want to go into spoilers, but it's way more advanced than anything IRL. Jan 29, 2021 at 8:50
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Preamble: proving the absence of something is a daunting task.
In this case, it would require having seen every episode and read every chapter with the utmost attention to every detail, and being able to answer every possible "Is THIS based on real-world science?" question.
Pointing at a specific event and asking whether (or to what degree) it conforms to actual scientific facts would be far more feasible a mission.

Having said that, and having added that I haven't read the manga, I think the anime makes a point of being scientifically accurate, so much so that every episode end with this statement:

This is a work of fiction, but the plants, animals, and production methods described are based on reality. Foraging and making things on your own accord is extermely dangerous and, in some cases, illegal. Please do not imitate without expertise.

This is a work of fiction, but the plants, animals, and production methods described are based on reality.
Foraging and making things on your own accord is extermely dangerous and, in some cases, illegal. Please do not imitate without expertise.

Proving the power of scientific knowledge (especially in a world that has forgotten it) is the main theme of the show, and having the characters succeed because of fictional elements would clearly undermine it.

If we want to find shortcomings, I think we can find them not in the presence of imaginary elements but rather in the handwaving of some "logistical difficulties".
For example, the fact that the "Kingdom of Science" is withing walking distance of gold, copper and iron ore deposits (to say nothing of the other minerals) and a pool of sulfuric acid is extremely convenient plot-wise, but probably a bit unrealistic.

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    The hyper-dense mineral deposits within walking distance of the Kingdom of Science turn out to not be natural. The prequel manga goes into a bit of detail where they came from (but it's nothing that couldn't be explained with modern science). Jan 29, 2021 at 6:08

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