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Warning, many spoilers of Alice in Wonderland and sequel.

In Tim Burton's Alice in Wonderland Alice has nightmares that are actually memories of her first visit to Wonderland when she was a child. She didn't remember she had actually been to Wonderland until she talked with Absolem in Marmoreal.

So Tim Burton's Alice takes place during her 2nd visit in Wonderland. In that visit, Alice arrives in Wonderland through the rabbit hole (again) and eventually returns to England by drinking the blood of the Jabberwocky.

In Alice through the Looking Glass Alice travels through mirrors between England and Wonderland multiple times.

My question is how did Alice return from Wonderland from her very first visit. I don't remember anymore. What I can recall is that she entered Wonderland through a rabbit hole (just like the 2nd time) and as for her departure I recall the following:

The young Alice unintentionally destroyed the Red Queen's house of cards. The Red Queen got so angry she wanted Alice's head down, she ordered to arrest her. Just as the guards grabbed Alice she managed to escape back to England.

However, I don't remember anymore how the young Alice escaped. Do you know? Thank you.

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Noting that the film is a spiritual (rather than literal) sequel to the original Disney film and source book (e.g. rather than a direct sequel), in the 1951 cartoon she is attacked by the queen and her henchmen, then wakes up.

This fairly reflects the original source novel.

"Who cares for you?" said Alice, (she had grown to her full size by this time.) "You're nothing but a pack of cards!"

At this the whole pack rose up into the air, and came flying down upon her: she gave a little scream, half of fright and half of anger, and tried to beat them off, and found herself lying on the bank, with her head in the lap of her sister, who was gently brushing away some dead leaves that had fluttered down from the trees upon her face.

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  • Alright it was a dream, but the dreams are memories of her actual visit. The talking door in your movie clip refuses to open to let Alice go. Is this how Alice actually escaped?
    – John
    Dec 14 '20 at 8:42
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    @John - I don't recall any specific information from the two films about her original return (e.g. in the film universe), but the clear implication is that it's a dream-world so 'waking up' seems the most logical way of returning to normality.
    – Valorum
    Dec 14 '20 at 8:58
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    So your take is that the Wonderland exists in Alice's dreams only (unlike in Tim Burton's movie and sequel)?
    – John
    Dec 14 '20 at 9:30
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    @John - Or even that it exists in dreams only in all settings
    – Valorum
    Dec 14 '20 at 12:30
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    @DarthPseudonym - Burton was very clear that the film isn't a direct sequel to the book or earlier film.
    – Valorum
    Dec 14 '20 at 20:04
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Carroll’s The Nursery Alice may best explain how exactly Alice was awakened. Here Carroll deals explicitly with her dream sequence, from start to finish. Once Alice has a verbal fight with the Queen of Hearts, and she insults the whole court with

“Who cares for ‘you’? You’re nothing but a pack of cards!”, the cards “...were ‘all’ very angry, and flew up into the air, and came tumbling down again, all over Alice, just like a shower of rain.

And I think you’ll ‘never’ guess what happened next. The next thing was, Alice woke up out of her curious dream. And she found that the cards were only some leaves off the tree, that the wind had blown down upon her face. ‘Wouldn’t’ it be a nice thing to have a curious dream, just like Alice. The best plan is this. First lie down under a tree, and wait till a White Rabbit runs by, with a watch in his hand: then shut your eyes, and pretend to be dear little Alice.” (P. 56, original pagination).

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From the original, she just woke up

At this the whole pack rose up into the air, and came flying down upon her; she gave a little scream, half of fright and half of anger, and tried to beat them off, and found herself lying on the bank, with her head in the lap of her sister, who was gently brushing away some dead leaves that had fluttered down from the trees upon her face.

"Wake up, Alice dear!" said her sister; "why, what a long sleep you've had!"

"Oh, I've had such a curious dream!" said Alice, and she told her sister, as well as she could remember them, all these strange Adventures of hers that you have just been reading about; and when she had finished, her sister kissed her, and said, "It was a curious dream, dear, certainly: but now run in to your tea; it's getting late." So Alice got up and ran off, thinking while she ran, as well she might, what a wonderful dream it had been.

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