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I need help finding this really good book that I read a long time ago where Martians try to invade Earth because back at Mars, they need more resources.

I had read this book quite long ago, so I remember only these details :-

  • They came in a sort of 'capsule' that could change the amount of gravity felt inside. I know this because of the fact that when they landed, the Martians cannot bear the Earth's gravitational pull because it is much more than their own planet's.

  • The Martians did not care about how many humans they killed nor how they did it.

  • They tried to disrupt architecture and machinery as well such as post offices (not sure) and telegraphs (quite sure).

  • Their killing machines (or something like that) emitted 'black smoke' as their weapon.

  • The book ended with the aliens dying because of the microorganisms that inhabit the planet. But I don't quite remember why.

  • This book was quite well known, and a movie was also made on the book.

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    War of the Worlds by H G Wells? Jan 1 at 9:44
  • @JohnRennie, can't tell. As written in the OP, I read it quite a long time ago. Jan 1 at 9:55
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    I've downvoted for an absence of independent research. Even googling the title gives you the answer twelve times in the first 20 results.
    – Valorum
    Jan 1 at 13:06
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This sounds like The War of the Worlds by H. G. Wells.

  • They come in a sort of 'capsule' that can change the amount of Gravity felt inside. I know this because of the fact that when they landed, the Martians cannot bear the Earths' gravitational pull because it is much more than their own planet's.

    I don't think there is any mention of the Martians being able to change gravity. They use their machines to support themselves against Earth's gravity, but they don't change the gravity.

    I began to comfort her and myself by repeating all that Ogilvy had told me of the impossibility of the Martians establishing themselves on the earth. In particular I laid stress on the gravitational difficulty. On the surface of the earth the force of gravity is three times what it is on the surface of Mars. A Martian, therefore, would weigh three times more on Mars, albeit his muscular strength would be the same. His own body would be a cope of lead to him. That, indeed, was the general opinion. Both The Times and the Daily Telegraph, for instance, insisted on it the next morning, and both overlooked, just as I did, two obvious modifying influences.

    The atmosphere of the earth, we now know, contains far more oxygen or far less argon (whichever way one likes to put it) than does Mars. The invigorating influences of this excess of oxygen upon the Martians indisputably did much to counterbalance the increased weight of their bodies. And, in the second place, we all overlooked the fact that such mechanical intelligence as the Martians possessed was quite able to dispense with muscular exertion at a pinch.

  • They tried to disrupt architecture and machinery as well such as post-offices (not sure) and telegraphs (quite sure).

    And beyond, over the blue hills that rise southward of the river, the glittering Martians went to and fro, calmly and methodically spreading their poison cloud over this patch of country and then over that, laying it again with their steam jets when it had served its purpose, and taking possession of the conquered country. They do not seem to have aimed at extermination so much as at complete demoralisation and the destruction of any opposition. They exploded any stores of powder they came upon, cut every telegraph, and wrecked the railways here and there.

  • Their killing machines (or something like that,) emitted 'black smoke' as their weapon.

    "The Martians are able to discharge enormous clouds of a black and poisonous vapour by means of rockets. They have smothered our batteries, destroyed Richmond, Kingston, and Wimbledon, and are advancing slowly towards London, destroying everything on the way. It is impossible to stop them. There is no safety from the Black Smoke but in instant flight.”

  • The book ended with the aliens dying because of the microorganisms that inhabit the planet. But I don't quite remember why.

    For so it had come about, as indeed I and many men might have foreseen had not terror and disaster blinded our minds. These germs of disease have taken toll of humanity since the beginning of things—taken toll of our prehuman ancestors since life began here. But by virtue of this natural selection of our kind we have developed resisting power; to no germs do we succumb without a struggle, and to many—those that cause putrefaction in dead matter, for instance—our living frames are altogether immune. But there are no bacteria in Mars, and directly these invaders arrived, directly they drank and fed, our microscopic allies began to work their overthrow. Already when I watched them they were irrevocably doomed, dying and rotting even as they went to and fro. It was inevitable. By the toll of a billion deaths man has bought his birthright of the earth, and it is his against all comers; it would still be his were the Martians ten times as mighty as they are. For neither do men live nor die in vain.

  • This book was quite well known, and a movie was also made on the book.

The most famous film is probably the 1953 film The War of the Worlds

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