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I couldn't find a good answer anywhere else, and I can't find my copy of the 2001 edition either to confirm or cross reference handwriting.

The 2001 edition contains diegetic scribbled notes from characters in the series, namely Harry, Ron and Hermione.

One of which is initialled by Ron (in the section on Leprechauns):

"but not mine. R. W."

Is there anyway to match the handwriting between other notes to attribute them to a character? Or is that not possible due to similar handwriting?

I don't think this is directly from the author as none of the handwritings in the book resemble JKR's handwriting.

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  • Is this asking in-universe or out-of-universe? Like do you want to know if it was JKR vs the book's designer, or are you asking which character they're meant to be ascribed to?
    – ibid
    Commented Jun 28, 2021 at 10:46
  • @ibid: let me know if I can make this sentence clearer: "Is there anyway to match the handwriting between other notes to attribute them to a character". If it's not obvious, it's which character they're meant to be ascribed to.
    – AncientSwordRage
    Commented Jun 28, 2021 at 10:50
  • I think the answer then is a disappointing "no". They're all written in JKR's handwriting, and as far as I can tell there's no attempt made to use different styles for each character. You're meant to figure out from context, not from handwriting.
    – ibid
    Commented Jun 28, 2021 at 10:53
  • 1
    Looking through it again, it seems that there's a consistent style used to represent "Harry and Ron", though the two lines from Hermione are distinguished by being in cursive.
    – ibid
    Commented Jun 28, 2021 at 11:06
  • Also, none of the handwritings in the book resemble JKR's handwriting.
    – AncientSwordRage
    Commented Jun 28, 2021 at 11:18

1 Answer 1

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+100

Hermione only writes two lines on the "This book belongs to" page. She writes in full cursive.

Otherwise, Ron and Harry's handwritings are distinct throughout the rest of the book. Harry's writing is smaller and sort of half in cursive; Ron's is larger, messier, and basically not in cursive at all. There's also a noticeable distinction in how they form "y" and "g".

Sample:

Ron and Hermione:

enter image description here

Harry:

enter image description here

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Ron:

enter image description here

enter image description here

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  • 1
    Nice, I've never noticed that difference before. Going to have to give the book a fresh read now.
    – ibid
    Commented Jun 28, 2021 at 13:56
  • Great to see such a nice analysis based on evidence rather than just quotes, but I don't want to upvote because your rep is 3333 :-P
    – Rand al'Thor
    Commented Jul 1, 2021 at 18:22

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