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I have just watched Arrival, and there is a scene that has confused me a little bit.

We learn at the end of the film that Louise has acquired the ability to see the future. She uses this skill to get to know what exact words to say to the Chinese general and get them to open up their gathered information. However, in that conversation (i.e. in the future) she doesn't seem to remember calling him up in the past (i.e. in the present). So, apparently, the Louise of the future doesn't remember what the Louise of the present (which is the Louise of the past by the time the conversation is being held) does.

How can this be explained? Is it a paradox, or is it all right?

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    Once you've learned to think like a heptapod, the past and the present exist simultaneously within memory. There's no paradox. It's all a bit jumbledy though, because we're only just starting out.
    – Valorum
    Jul 18 at 22:40
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    1/3 - Even though I'm proficient with Heptapod B, I know I don't experience reality the way a heptapod does. My mind was cast in the mold of human, sequential languages, and no amount of immersion in an alien language can completely reshape it. My worldview is an amalgam of human and heptapod.
    – Valorum
    Jul 18 at 22:45
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    2/3 - Before I learned how to think in Heptapod B, my memories grew like a column of cigarette ash, laid down by the infinitesimal sliver of combustion that was my consciousness, marking the sequential present. After I learned Heptapod B, new memories fell into place like gigantic blocks, each one measuring years in duration, and though they didn't arrive in order or land contiguously, they soon composed a period of five decades. It is the period during which I know Heptapod B well enough to think in it, starting during my interviews with Flapper and Raspberry and ending with my death.
    – Valorum
    Jul 18 at 22:46
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    3/3 - Usually, Heptapod B affects just my memory: my consciousness crawls along as it did before, a glowing sliver crawling forward in time, the difference being that the ash of memory lies ahead as well as behind: there is no real combustion. But occasionally I have glimpses when Heptapod B truly reigns, and I experience past and future all at once; my consciousness becomes a half-century-long ember burning outside time. I perceive— during those glimpses— that entire epoch as a simultaneity. It's a period encompassing the rest of my life, and the entirety of yours.
    – Valorum
    Jul 18 at 22:46
  • @Valorum I'm not sure I'm understanding how those passages answer my question. Maybe I didn't ask my question clearly enough. What I want to understand is whether what she sees in the future is actually what will happen in the future, or if it's just how you remember things in the past (that may sometimes be blurry or incomplete) but in the future. (Also, if you want you can add this as an answer so I can accept it.)
    – Tendero
    Jul 18 at 23:08