30

In the books, much is made of Tyrion being younger than Cersei, which may or may not have implications.

This has me wondering, does she have two younger brothers? After all, Jaime and Cersei are twins and presumably born within hours or even minutes of each other. But if it has been said which was born first, I must have missed it in an earlier novel.

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  • 5
    You say implications, I say Valonqar!
    – Skooba
    Aug 16 at 19:53
  • 2
    @Skooba I'm trying to not ruin anything for anyone.
    – John O
    Aug 16 at 20:03
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    Fair enough, but if you know what that word means, you probably already know the potentials ;-)
    – Skooba
    Aug 16 at 21:01
51

Cersei was born first but literally only just. It is said Jamie followed her clutching onto her foot.

"Both." She did not flinch from the truth. "Since we were children together. And why not? The Targaryens wed brother to sister for three hundred years, to keep the bloodlines pure. And Jaime and I are more than brother and sister. We are one person in two bodies. We shared a womb together. He came into this world holding my foot, our old maester said. When he is in me, I feel... whole." The ghost of a smile flitted over her lips.

A Game of Thrones, "Eddard XII"

If the above isn't enough of a hint when you know that in most births the head comes out first it is actually made more explicit later on.

Never, Tyrion wanted to say, but the word caught in his throat. Cersei always resented being excluded from power on account of her sex. If Dornish law applied in the west, she would be the heir to Casterly Rock in her own right. She and Jaime were twins, but Cersei had come first into the world, and that was all it took. By championing Myrcella's cause she would be championing her own. "I do not know how my sister would choose, between Tommen and Myrcella," he admitted. "It makes no matter. My father will never give her that choice."

A Storm of Swords, "Tyrion IX"

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    I'm too slow because I chased down a second reference: "She and Jaime were twins, but Cersei had come first into the world, and that was all it took." -ASoS, Chapter 66 Tyrion IX
    – DavidW
    Aug 16 at 20:01
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    @DavidW I knew there was a quote in ASOS but couldn't find it, thanks!
    – TheLethalCarrot
    Aug 16 at 20:03
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    Well done on that quote. I completely missed it
    – Alarion
    Aug 16 at 20:09
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    That “holding my foot” is a reference to Jacob and Esau from Genesis 25. Aug 17 at 11:32
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Cersei was the first born of the twins.

Tyrion reflect on this with Oberyn and while deciding who may be crowned after Joffrey's death.

If Dornish law applied in the west, she would be the heir to Casterly Rock in her own right. She and Jaime were twins, but Cersei had come first into the world, and that was all it took.

A Storm of Swords - Tyrion IX

11

Cersei was most likely born first

I can't find a quote from the books that states it outright, but Cersei does say

He came into this world holding my foot, our old maester said.

In most vaginal deliveries, the baby's head comes out first. If that were the case for the Lannister twins and Jaime was indeed holding Cersei's foot, then it makes sense that she was born first as her feet would be followed by his head with his arm reaching up to hold her foot.

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    This seems like solid evidence. Especially given that this seems to be referential/a callback to the biblical story of Jacob and Esau. Aug 16 at 20:12

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