9

The Millennium Falcon is a pretty big ship. But what are its exact dimensions and mass?

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  • 1
    Mass is proving quite hard to pin down.
    – Valorum
    Jan 23 at 17:16
  • 1
    Hmm. The canonical mass of an X-Wing is 10 tons. If we assume that the Falcon contains about the same material as twenty of those, then that gives us a baseline weight of approx. 200 tons.
    – Valorum
    Jan 23 at 19:55
  • 3
    @Valorum You typically have to weld it on, otherwise it'll fall off again.
    – Spencer
    Jan 23 at 22:07
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    @RussellMcMahon It seems there aren't any large fuel tanks either, and let's not forget this is a cargo ship - though according to ICS, the cargo space volume seems a pretty small fraction of the entire ship (more like a caravan than a real cargo hauler). Still, a lot of empty space - lots of big rooms and corridors.
    – Luaan
    Jan 24 at 10:58
  • 3
    I think its mass is about 2 parsecs
    – frarugi87
    Jan 24 at 16:37

3 Answers 3

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Various sources about the dimension of the Millennium Falcon exist. They're not all in agreement, but most of the modern canon sources state that the ship's length is around 35-40m and that its height is around 7.5m, not including its landing struts.

Canon

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Solo: A Star Wars Story - The Official Guide

and

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The Last Jedi: Incredible Cross-Sections

and

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The Force Awakens: Incredible Cross Sections

and

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Star Wars: Complete Vehicles - Incredible Cross-Sections (2020)

Legends

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Millennium Falcon Owner's Workshop Manual

and

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Star Wars: Build the Millennium Falcon

The DeAgostini factbooks seem to have persistent error, identifying the ship as 26.7 metres long.

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Star Wars: The Official Starships & Vehicles Collection #1

and

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Star Wars: The Official Fact Files #4

and

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The New Essential Guide to Vehicles and Vessels

Corrected in the rebooted magazine series from 2013 onward.

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Star Wars: The Official Fact Files (2013) #1

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    I love how in that first image that the Falcon has dimensions of a whole number of feet and inches, but speed is a nice round number of kph. Talk about mixing up units, let alone from a far away galaxy a long time ago.
    – Peter M
    Jan 24 at 0:32
  • @PeterM If you do the conversions, you get: 7.58m is 24ft 10.4in and 40.80m is 133ft 10.3in. The other way, you get 7.59m and 40.82m. Either the metric values were used as a base (rounded up to the next inch), or the conversions are plainly wrong. It's just that 7.58 doesn't look nice and round. Jan 24 at 14:29
  • 1
    On a different note, it occurs to me that the first source greatly differs on the length likely because the Falcon in Solo includes the escape pod. Jan 24 at 15:10
  • 1
    @Mazura - It can carry 100 metric tons. That might be 4 cubic metres of gold, 12 cubic metres of steel or100 cubic metres of water
    – Valorum
    Jan 24 at 15:58
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    @DarrellHoffman - There are multiple remarks in the 'making of Star Wars' books about how the setmakers struggled to make the exterior of the Falcon look like it could possibly contain the internal sets that we see, with the cast walking around with ample headroom
    – Valorum
    Jan 24 at 21:34
3

According to Wookieepedia:

Length. 34.37 meters.
Width. 25.61 meters.
Height/depth. 8.27 meters (including lower cannon and upper sensor array)
MGLT. 75 MGLT.
Maximum speed (atmosphere) 1,050 km/h.
Engine unit(s) 2 Girodyne SRB42 sublight engines (heavily modified)

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    The note says that figure is taken from, Solo: A Star Wars Story The Official Guide. Jan 24 at 8:18
  • @GeoffAtkins - The only place I've seen it referred to as 34.37m is the 'Build the Millennium Falcon' book.
    – Valorum
    Jan 24 at 22:28
  • @Valorum - Yes, my comment came after your answer which categorically demonstrates that the values cited in Wookieepedia don't match the values in the source they are citing. Unless there are significantly different values in different editions. Jan 24 at 23:25
  • Per my answer, the whole thing is a big jumbly mess.
    – Valorum
    Jan 25 at 13:43
3

This doesn't directly answer the question, but I thought it was worth mentioning as potentially helpful supplemental info.

Supposedly, the Millennium Falcon at Disney World is constructed at full scale. A little googling finds this reference, which is being a bit wonky at the time I'm posting this. But I did have the privilege of visiting the park myself, and I'm positive I also read this fact someplace while I was there.

Maybe someone can find a better source with more data on the Disney MF?

That said, as to whether the Disney Millennium Falcon is truly what we'd think of as "full scale" (i.e., what we see on screen), I have no way of knowing. Seeing it up close, my initial reaction was that I thought it'd be slightly larger (for instance, it struck me how crammed the cockpit seemed like it would be). But either way, that thing is pretty close to what you'd imagine.

If anyone has some fancy imaging software that's good with measuring distances (or knows a Disney employee who can go measure it), it might make a good point of comparison.

Edit: Following @Valorum's comment below, I completely agree that what we see on-screen inside the ship is vastly incongruent with what we see outside. I only mention the cockpit as an exception to this because that's the one interior section we typically can see from external views.

In any case, it might be interesting (or at least fun) to know how the dimensions of the Disney Falcon match up with the figures quoted in other responses here.

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  • 2
    The 'full scale' ship in the film was wildly inconsistent externally to what we see inside.
    – Valorum
    Jan 24 at 22:18
  • @Valorum You're right, of course. There's no way the interior sets would fit inside the real-life model at Disney. The "canonical outside" has to be different than the "canonical inside," I guess.
    – Dan
    Jan 24 at 22:22
  • 1
    Timelord science allows this sort of thing.
    – Valorum
    Jan 24 at 22:26
  • Well if the Millenium Falcon is a TARDIS it would be perfect for smuggling. Jan 24 at 23:24

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