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Black and white sci-fi film. US and USSR build supercomputers to run missiles, computers link up become sentient and take over the world by threat of nukes. A designer tries to disable them, fails and is made to watch his friends executed as he is needed.

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    This is, of course, the Forbin Project; scifi.stackexchange.com/questions/241689/…. Not black and white, I might add, but filmed in Technicolor
    – Valorum
    May 1 at 18:45
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    Thankyou, i work in analogue mentally so B&W could have been the TV.
    – Mark Kelly
    May 1 at 20:07
  • Found it free to download on internet archive, Happy Happy Joy Joy!
    – Mark Kelly
    May 1 at 20:19
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    Don't forget to mark my answer as accepted (or confirm it's correct in a comment)
    – Valorum
    May 1 at 20:20

1 Answer 1

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This is Colossus: The Forbin Project.

[A]n advanced American defense system, named Colossus, becom[es] sentient. After being handed full control, Colossus' draconian logic expands on its original nuclear defense directives to assume total control of the world and end all warfare for the good of mankind despite its creators' orders to stop.

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    Its star, from a movie well over fifty years old, is still working. i recall the portrayal of the computers while of course dated is not a cringey as many movies that dealt with artificial intelligence made in those days -- it had the two machines communicating in a language they made up and i believe something like that was alleged to have occurred in real life within the past decade or so.
    – releseabe
    May 1 at 19:12
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    @releseabe - It struck me that Hollywood would have given it a stupid action sequence ending if it was filmed today.
    – Valorum
    May 1 at 19:15
  • yes, it was, thinking back, the sort of low-key way the showed the power of the machine. Colossus did not use robots/cyborgs or anything -- SPOILER: its great willingness to, in concert with Guardian, use nukes and its invulnerable location made humans obey it. It seemed fairly plausible. But we won't know until we turn over control of our nukes to the equivalent of AlphaZero (the superhuman chess AI) just how plausible -- I can hardly wait.
    – releseabe
    May 1 at 19:32
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    @fred_dot_u - The novel was good. The sequels were dire
    – Valorum
    May 1 at 20:20
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    It also has a way of portraying the government's reaction to the events in a far more credible way than today's over-dramatization of everything.
    – pipe
    May 2 at 17:17

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