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What the title says.

Image of Ilirea from The Official Eragon Colouring Book Image of the city from The Official Eragon Colouring Book

Assuming that in the image the scales are a bit exaggerated, how high do the books say that the ceiling of Ilirea is over the level of the streets?

I say that the scales are exaggerated because the wall is suposedly 300 feet tall. That's 100 meters. To picture it better, it's like 33 3-meter-stories high. Also, the pyramid of Cheops is just 30 meters higher.

And the highest estimated wall on Earth has been the wall of the round city of Bagdad (30 meters, 90 feet).

To top it off, there are some roofs of human-built houses (no magic involved + medieval age technology) peeking a bit behind the wall, so unless they are 25 or 30 stories high, the scale is overinflated.

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  • You're assuming the ground under the overhang is completely flat?
    – Valorum
    May 29 at 14:18
  • Not exactly, but also it would be very costly for it to be perfectly terraced. I suppose the deeper end is a bit higher than the outside to be able to build a citadel there without an exorbitant cost. May 29 at 16:43
  • @4.12.22.4.18.0. Actually Herodotus wrote that the walls of ancient Babylon were about 300 feet tall, though archaeologists disagre. In real life some medieval secular and religious towers were higher than 300 feet tall. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Towers_of_Bologna en.wikipedia.org/wiki/San_Gimignano en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_tallest_clock_towers en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_tallest_church_buildings Continued May 29 at 17:24
  • @4.12.22.4.18.0. Continued en.wikipedia.org/wiki/… Also the picture looks like there is a inner wall with towers far behind the outer wall. Unless the inner wall and its towers are at least 300 feet talll the only way they can show above the other wall and its towers is if the ground level rises up behind the outer wall toward the inner cliff. May 29 at 17:25
  • The towers are okay for points of interest, like the elven towers, but in a city in the middle ages, it's borderline impossible to build more than a handful of towers of that height. It is also impractical. Land prices would be so high that people would go away from the city. May 29 at 17:41

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Actually Herodotus wrote that the walls of ancient Babylon were about 300 feet tall, though archaeologists disagre. In real life some medieval secular and religious towers were higher than 300 feet tall.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Towers_of_Bologna

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/San_Gimignano

enter link description here

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_tallest_church_buildings

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_the_world%27s_tallest_buildings#Churches_and_cathedrals:_tallest_buildings_between_the_13th_and_20th_century

Also the picture looks like there is a inner wall with towers far behind the outer wall. Unless the inner wall and its towers are at least 300 feet tall the only way they can show above the other wall and its towers is if the ground level rises up behind the outer wall toward the inner cliff. So the picture strongly suggests that the inner wall has a much higher base ground level than the outer wall, and some of the towers between the inner and outer wall might also have higher ground level bases than the base of the higher wall.

See my answer to this question:

https://worldbuilding.stackexchange.com/questions/77984/tallest-building-possible-by-the-roman-empire

And see my answer at:

https://worldbuilding.stackexchange.com/questions/102573/could-a-supertall-building-have-been-built-in-the-18th-century/102640#102640

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  • Is there any real and actual wall that is 100 meters tall? Jun 1 at 10:10

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