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The brother of the narrator has some chapters in The War of the Worlds, but at the end, we do not learn what happens to him. I was expecting to find out whether he is alive or not, but eventually the book ended without telling the reader anything about him. This is especially strange because, in the last chapter, the narrator visits London - his brother's hometown - but does not mention the brother. Or did I miss something?

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The last time we see the Narrator's Brother is at the end of Book I. He makes good his escape with the fleet heading to Ostend and presumably survived the Martian attack since he was able to subsequently recount his adventures to The Narrator.

The sun sank into grey clouds, the sky flushed and darkened, the evening star trembled into sight. It was deep twilight when the captain cried out and pointed. My brother strained his eyes. Something rushed up into the sky out of the greyness—rushed slantingly upward and very swiftly into the luminous clearness above the clouds in the western sky; something flat and broad, and very large, that swept round in a vast curve, grew smaller, sank slowly, and vanished again into the grey mystery of the night. And as it flew it rained down darkness upon the land.

You may wish to note that although the brother is studying medicine in London, there's no good indication that this is his and the narrator's home town. Given the damage to the city, it's unlikely he would have returned since he would presumably want to carry on his studies elsewhere as soon as possible.

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  • Right, I phrased it wrong. Maybe it's not his hometown but he just lives there. Anyway, I just finished reading and know that this is where we read about the brother for last time. But after this so much happens and I was very surprised not to learn what happens to him. Thought maybe I missed it..
    – LulY
    Commented Dec 17, 2022 at 19:24
  • @IgorstandswithUkraine - You didn't miss anything. He literally and metaphorically sails off into the sunset.
    – Valorum
    Commented Dec 17, 2022 at 19:29
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    Howc could the narrator know what the brother saw unless he heard it from someone who was there on the ship? How could the narrator know that his brother was on the ship? Would be a record with his brother's name listed among the passengers, or was the ship boarded too fast for anyone to take the names of passengers? Maybe the narrator heard his brother was there from somone who knew and recotgnized him. But the most logical deduction is that the brother later met the narrator and told him his experiences. I always assumed that the brother must have survived. Commented Dec 17, 2022 at 19:49
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    @M.A.Golding - That's a pretty good point (see edit). That being said, the Narrator also recounts the experiences of people who've died and couldn't possibly have shared their stories with him
    – Valorum
    Commented Dec 17, 2022 at 19:52
  • @M.A.Golding I agree what Valorum writes plus even if the narrator doesn't know what happened with his brother, as you suggest, then I at least would await that the narrator wonders what happened to the brother. But he is simply not mentioned after the passage quoted by Valorum.
    – LulY
    Commented Dec 17, 2022 at 19:57

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