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I'm looking for a movie circa 2010-2015 about a group of people (possibly all adults) gathering orchids (possibly another flower) in order to create some kind of serum.

This serum is some kind of mind-control substance that manipulates people into producing more of this serum. It is revealed that this is part of the life-cycle of the orchid.

According to a short summary I've read about "Orphan Black" (2013-2017) it seems similar in plot. However, I clearly remember that it was a film and not a serial.

Other elements that might help:

  • Language in the film was English
  • Location was mainly in North America
  • Period is in the modern era (contemporary present).
  • There might have been a book or an author as a somewhat important plot element.
  • The orchids might have been blue or purple.
  • The serum was forcibly injected into people.
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  • This reminds me a bit of tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Film/BeyondTheBlackRainbow for some reason, but no flowers...
    – FuzzyBoots
    May 17, 2023 at 12:29
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    I don't think Orphan Black had any orchid or self-perpetuating behavior plotlines, though I didn't see the last season.
    – Zeiss Ikon
    May 17, 2023 at 13:29
  • A space-opera version of this appears in Child of Fortune by Norman Spinrad.
    – Spencer
    May 17, 2023 at 15:34
  • @ZeissIkon That'll teach me: believing what 🐂💩 chatGPT says without actually verifying the info 😅
    – Daze
    May 17, 2023 at 17:27
  • Huh, I was thinking of Adaptation, which meets some of the criteria, it's 2002, so a little earlier than your window, it does involve people making a serum (more of a narcotic really) out of orchids, and an author is a major plot point (multiple authors actually). Setting, present-day Florida, check. Missing: Forcible injections and mind control, though it does reference Being John Malkovich which had the latter. May 18, 2023 at 13:44

1 Answer 1

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Upstream Color (2013)

A man and woman are drawn together, entangled in the life cycle of an ageless organism. Identity becomes an illusion as they struggle to assemble the loose fragments of wrecked lives.

Orchids are, indeed, involved in the complex life cycle of the parasite:

At each stage of the worm-pig-orchid cycle there’s someone who profits from that stage and, unknowingly, advances the parasite to the next stage. The first person, whom the credits call the Thief (played by Thiago Martins), infects victims with the worm to brainwash them and steal their money. We see him do this to Kris, and we learn that he’s also done this to Jeff.

The second person, whom the credits call the Sampler (Andrew Sensenig), takes the worms from the Thief’s victims and puts them into pigs. The transfer of the worm establishes a connection between the victim and the pig, and the Sampler can then use the pigs to “sample” the victims’ experiences—each time he approaches a victim’s pig, he can see what’s going in that victim’s life. The Sampler is then inspired by these experiences to record music, which he sells through his record company, Quinoa Valley Rec. Co.

The third person, or actually the third group of people, are the two orchid farmers—the credits call them the Orchid Mother (Kathy Carruth) and the Orchid Daughter (Meredith Burke). When the Sampler disposes of pigs by bagging them and throwing them into a nearby stream, the parasite leaches out of the pigs and into white orchids, turning them blue. The two orchid farmers then pick these rare blue orchids and sell them through their company, E+P Exotics.

The Thief then buys these rare blue orchids—at the beginning of the film we can see that the flower pots he buys are labeled E+P Exotics—and uses the worms that come out of them, beginning the W-P-O cycle anew.

Found with a search for film orchids drug mind control

Trailer

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  • 1
    You were so quick! Thank you! That's exactly the film I was looking for.
    – Daze
    May 17, 2023 at 12:53
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    Glad to help. This site is a hobby for me, and has helped me with my own queries.
    – FuzzyBoots
    May 17, 2023 at 12:55

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