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"One ring to bring them all.. and in The Darkness bind them"

For the longest time, I thought this was simply a metaphor for evil. But I discovered recently that Morgoth generated a special sort of Darkness that could 'pierce the eye and the mind' and cause suffering and dismay. It was not mere lack of light. Do you think this line of the inscription is actually a reference to Melkor's evil?

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I don't think it's got anything to do with Melkor.

Sauron created the One Ring -

"The Dark Lord Sauron forged in secret a master ring, to control all others. And into this ring he poured his cruelty, his malice, and his will to dominate all life. One Ring to rule them all." —Galadriel regarding Sauron and the forging of the One Ring.

He put this inscription inside it -

Ash nazg durbatulûk, ash nazg gimbatul, ash nazg thrakatulûk, agh burzum-ishi krimpatul.

In Westron the inscription translated into One Ring to Rule Them All, One Ring to Find Them, One Ring to Bring Them All, and in the Darkness Bind Them.

The darkness refers to Barad-dûr in Mordor which is where Sauron intended to bind them all to him.

More info here -

Sauron encouraged and assisted the Elves in forging the Rings of Power, though in secret Sauron forged his own; the One Ring to rule the Elvish rings. Upon the ring, Sauron left the inscription; Ash nazg durbatulûk, ash nazg gimbatul, ash nazg thrakatulûk, agh burzum-ishi krimpatul. In Westron the inscription translated into One Ring to Rule Them All, One Ring to Find Them, One Ring to Bring Them All, and in the Darkness Bind Them.

However, as soon as Sauron put the Ring on his finger the Elves sensed his treachery, and thus removed their rings and hid them. Enraged, Sauron came against them in open war and demanded that all the Rings of Power be given to him. The Elves managed to hide the three greatest of the Rings from him, but the other sixteen Great rings were either captured by Sauron, destroyed, or lost. To the Dwarves he gave seven, but to Men he gave Nine, knowing that they would be the easiest to enslave. The Dwarf Lords who received the Rings proved to be very resistant to their power, and neither "faded" nor became enslaved to Sauron's will. The Rings instead created in insatiable lust for gold, which ultimately caused a great deal of grief for the Dwarves. As Sauron predicted however, the nine Men were all corrupted by their Rings and became the Nazgûl, Sauron's deadliest servants.

Had the Elves not recognized Sauron's treachery and forsaken the power of their rings, the results would have been catastrophic for the Free Peoples of Middle-Earth. It seems most if not all of the native humans in Middle-Earth succumbed to the power of the Ring once the Nazgûl were created, the Númenórians spared because of their distance. The Elves, had they been captured in this fashion, would have become the slaves of Sauron, and thus Celebrimbor's resistance is one of the key moments in the history of Middle-Earth.

http://lotr.wikia.com/wiki/Sauron

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