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In Empire Strikes Back, Yoda tells Luke that an object's size doesn't matter and that the difficulty of levitating an X-Wing was only in his mind. If the upper limits of TK are determined by belief, what's to stop a Jedi/Sith from pulling a moon out of orbit, moving an entire solar system, or splitting an atom with the Force?

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    To be fair, Starkiller did pull a star destroyer out of the sky in The Force Unleashed. – phantom42 Mar 6 '13 at 3:46
  • Was there any restriction about what the object was; did some (e.g. living things) have more or less pliancy? – Nick T Mar 6 '13 at 3:51
  • a star system consists of many individual items that would all have to be moved together, so if telekinesis is limited to a single object it won't work for one. Splitting an atom is not equivalent to moving an object, but to tearing it apart. Who knows, maybe it can be done, just because it's not demonstrated doesn't mean it's impossible. But remember splitting one atom won't do anything except maybe cause a mutation that over decades might possibly lead to another lifeform or a form of cancer. – jwenting Mar 6 '13 at 9:36
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    By the same reasoning, because Luke's XWing has wires, and landing gear, Yoda could not lift it from the swamp. – Lighthart Mar 8 '13 at 18:24
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    It's possible that the size may not actually matter but the amount of concentration necessary to makes one's self _ believe_ that the size does not matter is in fact the limiting factor. Luke might be inspired to believe that he can move an x-wing--but a moon? That would require some truly phenomenal paradigm reevaluation. – ApproachingDarknessFish Aug 19 '13 at 7:38
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Yes and No. Yoda may have been being metaphorical in his explanation of size not mattering. He was doing that zen master thing where the master asks or promotes an idea which makes the student think differently about whatever they are discussing. (What is the sound of one hand clapping...)

Size may matter less than one might believe but mass is surely a factor in moving something with Force Telekinesis. All things being equal, Force telekinesis likely has both mass limits and size limitations which vary from Jedi to Jedi. Even all of the greatest Force Telekinesis feats ever performed none have ever tried to move a natural body as large as a moon.

However, there are several examples of Jedi using Force Telekinesis to do amazing feats including pulling starships from the sky, and pushing entire fleets out of starsystems. Without an understanding of the physics of Force Telekinesis, it is impossible for anyone who wants to use physics to understand the physical limits.

Wookiepedia lists several examples of Force Telekinesis, canon and non-canon.

Among the most skilled users of telekinesis were the Zeison Sha. Neither Jedi nor Sith, their skilled use of telekinetic force use was developed over decades of simply surviving their planet's harsh environment, surpassing even some of the most powerful of Jedi in their skills. Their weapon of choice was a discblade, a circular bladed weapon that was thrown and manipulated with the Force and could be recalled. It required great skill in telekinesis to be wielded effectively.

The finest display of telekinesis ever, Jedi Dorsk 81, utilizing the channeled Force powers of all available Jedi of Luke Skywalker's Jedi Praxeum, used telekinesis to push seventeen Imperial I-class Star Destroyers out of the Yavin system. The massive amount of Force energy claimed the Jedi's life.

Perhaps, the most powerful of telekinetics were Galen Marek and Revan. Galen Marek was able to pull up the Imperial Star Destroyer, to himself. Revan broke away a considerable piece of Star Forge and crushed more then a hundred droids and Sith acolytes, by it.

Galen Marek was able to pull up the Imperial Star Destroyer, to himself

Galen Marek was able to pull up the Imperial Star Destroyer, to himself. How much do those things weigh, anyway?

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    For the record, Naga Sadow also pushed two stars together. – Omegacron Dec 18 '14 at 19:34
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    That makes absolutely NO SENSE. Given the mass of stars, it is impossible to believe anything like that could be done without rewriting the fabric of the UNIVERSE itself. – Thaddeus Howze Dec 18 '14 at 21:08
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    I don't disagree, but it happened in Tales of the Jedi. He nudged two small stars towards each other and made them collide. True story. – Omegacron Dec 18 '14 at 21:17
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    So you're saying Naga Sadow was a jerk when he was drinking. – Liesmith Dec 18 '14 at 23:13

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