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I can think of 3 kinds of big.

  • By volume
  • By a linear measure
  • By mass or weight

Bonus points for all three. Extra bonus points for the object being realistic in construction.

Let's add to it that it not be naturally occurring.

closed as too broad by Beofett, PearsonArtPhoto Jul 12 '13 at 18:01

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  • 2
    Perhaps consider removing the 'bonus points' .. how will you award them? – Tim Post Feb 19 '11 at 21:30
  • 13
    @Tim Post: perhaps consider growing a sense of fun. But to answer, I awarded them by picking the answer I did. – DampeS8N Feb 20 '11 at 2:22
  • By far not as big as Ringworld, but since it seems to be described in a relatively uncommon book, I'll mention The Ship, described by Robert Reed in his novels Marrow and The Well of Stars. It's a spaceship the size of Jupiter, containing, well ... a surprise ;-) – takrl Jun 16 '11 at 10:48
  • I have been known to award bonus points for answers I really like, by means of awarding a bounty. – Flimzy Nov 3 '11 at 1:18
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    Would the Tardis count for the "By Volume"? It's bigger on the inside, and as big as it needs to be! – AidanO Aug 15 '12 at 9:22

34 Answers 34

0

For the answer of mass I'm going with the transmitter stations in star trek voyager all together there where a couple hundred but each one was powered by a black hole if you but them together you have allot of mass sents they where artificially created

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One could argue that the creation of a parallel universe would satisfy the conditions of the OP's question.

  • The torbeast in Neal Asher's Cowl created parallel timelines.
  • Brandon Mull's Beyonders – engineered universe
  • Alistair Reynolds' Absolution Gap – parallel universe that has been ultimately destroyed by rogue terraforming machines (not an engineered universe, however any terraforming system that can take down a universe would have to be fairly large)

and others...

-3

Borg's Hypercube.

In Star Trek: Alien Spotlight - Borg comics, Picard located a point in Spacetime which was a whirlpool of Temporal Energy on which many many future events were balanced (According to calculations of Data). After jumping through it, Enterprise-E encountered Borg from the future. They found Borg's Hypercube which was very-very big in front of which Enterprise-E looked like ant.

  • 1
    Any evidence it's bigger than a Dyson Sphere? They are at least the size of a solar system, if you zoomed out far enough to see the entire thing you'd need an exceedingly strong telescope to see a ship near it. – Kevin Aug 27 '12 at 12:11
-4

Cybertron.

Its transformed and engineered body of Primus. Its used to be home planet of Transformers robot. Its size is significantly bigger than Earth. See its emerging body from space bridge in front of Earth as displayed in Transformers: Dark of the Moon movie:
Cybertron and Earth

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