40

Worf is billed as a proud warrior from a mighty warrior race who live for combat and fighting. His toughness and fighting skills are constantly referred to with awe and reverence. However, he's constantly bested, beaten and defeated; often quite easily by whoever he engages. Whether it's Jem'Hadar, Guinan, Borg, Lore, some guest alien or even other Klingons, he 'gets handled'.

Outside of Holodeck opponents, he seems to lose almost every confrontation he is in. Though he's always talking about battle and his strengths as a warrior, he gets his butt handed to him whenever he actually fights.

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    That video doesn't add much to your question, as most of the clips don't really apply. – Xantec Mar 26 '13 at 3:20
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    I feel like the proud warrior race thing (klingon reputation, as well as the jem'hadar reputation) gets too much emphasis in star trek exposition. As an entire race, perhaps on average they are more warrior-like than humans. Still, we routinely see star fleet personnel hold their own in melee combat with klingons or jem'hadar. Klingon civilians might be more warrior-like than human civilians, but I don't think klingon warriors are significantly better fighters than trained star fleet personnel – PeterL Mar 26 '13 at 12:40
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    @Izkata - found it... In Harry-Potter tag, of all places :) scifi.stackexchange.com/questions/17540/… – DVK-on-Ahch-To Mar 26 '13 at 13:27
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    Note to whoever voted to close as non-constructive - when a question is asked about something which is a Trope Namer, it's DEFINITELY answerable and constructive (see Izkata's answer). When you VTC as NC and the question gets a canonical answer, you should really reconsider your VTC strategies. – DVK-on-Ahch-To Mar 26 '13 at 13:29
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    Maybe because he was raised by wimpy human parents? – Mark Adler Mar 26 '13 at 15:59
70

It's a quick and simple way to show the viewer just how badass this new, unknown alien is.

During The Next Generation, Data and Worf had the most raw strength - Worf due to his Klingon heritage, and Data because he was an android. But Worf was also security personnel, with training to deal with intruders - so if a new unknown alien is able to toss him across the room, what chance did mere humans (or Betazoids, or...) have?

Because of how often it happened to Worf, TVTropes has dubbed this The Worf Effect.


Additional addendum, copied from the above TVTropes page:

On the video commentary for the episode "Errand of Mercy" on the Star Trek: The Original Series Season 1 Blu-Ray, the Worf Effect is very clearly referred to by VFX designer David Rossi. He notes that the production staff consciously used Worf as the "measuring stick" by which the strength and Badass-ery of villains was determined.

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    Excellent answer. We saw Worf do much better on DS9. I remember him picking up a guy with one arm, Darth Vader style, and throwing him across the room. Only an imbecile or an alien would get into a fistfight with someone that strong. – Kyle Jones Mar 26 '13 at 4:56
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    This was indeed less of a trope on Deep Space Nine. In one episode, he defeats a string of Jem'Hadar in a prison camp. – Paul D. Waite Mar 26 '13 at 8:12
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    Regarding the 'Warf Effect' in canon, an interesting concept but; If the same character who is touted as being tough but is repeatedly beaten by his opponents to show how tough the alien is, can result in 'Badass Decay' (that means the one we are told was badass is seen as badass no longer), and if abused, his claimed toughness could be seen as an 'Informed Ability', a subtrope of 'Informed Attribute' meaning a character's skill and abilities, frequently mentioned by the cast (and himself) are actually nonexistent in practice and we conclude that he wasn't really a badass to begin with. – Morgan Mar 26 '13 at 22:49
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    @Morgan I have no reference for this, but: TNG was an episodic series, especially near the beginning - there was little to no continuity between episodes, so there wasn't really a chance to build up his "badass-ness". So it was attributed to his species as a whole, as a shortcut for increasing his. DS9 had a lot more continuity, so they were able to handle it better overall. – Izkata Mar 29 '13 at 17:52
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    A big part of it was also that he was the security officer, so he would be the first to jump into any battle so statistically he is going to have the most losses numerically due to fighting the most hand-to-hand battles. Additionaly, most of his losses were against beings specifically invading or attacking the enterprise, the ones he would easily beat are not even going to make the attempt. So, a classic case of selection bias. – John Meacham Jul 16 '14 at 2:50
-26

Worf has evolved in different gravity. His balance is all wonky in earth-level gravity and pressure.

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    ...Where is this coming from? There's been nothing even like this in any ST canon. In ST VI, Kirk and Bones had no difficulties moving around on the Klingon homeworld. Riker had no difficulties living in the environment of a Klingon ship when he served aboard one, etc. Moreover, Worf grew up on Earth. There's absolutely 0 chance his performance is due to gravity differences. – Jeff Mar 26 '13 at 12:40
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    @jeff - Actually this isn't a dreadful answer. I'm pretty sure that Qo'noS has a gravity of 1.2G, more than sufficient to make his balance a bit dodgy. Also, Worf grew up (at least to a reasonable age) on the farming colony of Gault, not Earth. – Valorum Apr 15 '14 at 19:06
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    @Richard: Reference for Qo'noS having 1.2 gravities? Recall: Kirk and Spock could move easily (as if in 1G) during their trial there, and Riker could live just fine on the Klingon ship he served on. – Jeff Apr 15 '14 at 19:12
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    @Jeff - Nothing terribly canonical. The Haynes Klingon Manual lists the on-board gravity as Qo'noS Standard, with a surface acceleration of 1.2G ; books.google.co.uk/… – Valorum Apr 15 '14 at 19:16
  • The pedant in me is clamouring for a small g! :) – colmde Sep 10 at 7:52

protected by AncientSwordRage Oct 28 '15 at 21:59

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