13

This was a full-length novel I read a couple of years ago.

The father is the lead dev (or the security head I forget which) of a MMORPG with full VR immersion. There is some kind of coup by some players in the game. This leads to the game being locked down with the players stuck inside the game. The daughter and her party are stuck in there and start off on a quest.

I remember that the attack was a synchronized attack from both inside and game and outside the game.

  • 2
    something from .hack franchise? – Kreiri May 15 '13 at 6:29
  • 5
    Possibly Tad Williams' Otherland? – Daniel Roseman May 15 '13 at 8:04
  • 2
    I don't know the answer but I hope it will be found soon because right now I want to read this novel... :D – Frhay May 16 '13 at 11:11
  • Sounds closest to Tad Williams' Otherland, but it may also be Piers Anthony's Kilobyte – James Tomasino Jun 17 '13 at 0:34
  • It's not Otherland, the setup's all wrong. Otherland has VR, but it's not an MMORPG and there's no player-drive coup or intentional lockdown. – Yamikuronue Dec 17 '13 at 20:27
7

This sounds somewhat like the movie ExistenZ, which did have a tie-in novel published in 1999. I do not remember the father-daughter aspect in the movie, but have not read the book.

You are in a society where game designers are superstars and players can organically enter their favorite games. . . . A society where no one is more desired than Allegra Geller, the hip gaming goddess whose latest system, eXistenZ, takes a quantum leap beyond anything ever imagined--tapping so deeply into its users' fears and desires that it blurs the boundaries of reality.

Fleeing an assassination attempt from Anti-eXistenZialists determined to destroy the game and its creator, Allegra finds an ally in Ted Pikul, a young executive turned novice security guard sworn to protect her. Seeking shelter within her creation, Allegra persuades Ted to play the game, and the fugitives find themselves in a phantasmagoric world where existence ends and eXistenZ begins, a fantastic place where nothing is as it seems and the villains are all too real--and all too deadly.


Second theory after a bit of searching would be the Otherland tetralogy by Tad Willams (1996-2001), which sounds as though it would support various subplots of dropping into quasi-cyber-realities. (And now I see it's already been nominated.)

The story is set on Earth near the end of the 21st century, probably between 2082 and 2089, in a world where technology has advanced somewhat beyond the present. The most notable advancement is the widespread availability of full-immersion virtual reality installations, which allow people from all walks of life to access an online world, called simply the Net. Tad Williams weaves an intricate plot spanning four thick volumes, and creates a picture of a future society where virtual worlds are fully integrated into everyday life.

  • My ... God ... this movie is the worse piece of crap ever ... – Xaltar Dec 17 '13 at 16:41
7

Something very similiar to this happens in The Demi-Monde: Winter (2011) by Rod Rees.

The Demi-Monde is the most advanced computer simulation ever devised. Created to prepare soldiers for the nightmarish reality of urban warfare, it is a virtual world locked in eternal civil war. Its thirty million digital inhabitants are ruled by duplicates of some of history's cruellest tyrants: Reinhard Heydrich, the architect of the Holocaust; Beria, Stalin's arch executioner; Torquemada, the pitiless Inquisitor General; Robespierre, the face of the Reign of Terror.

But something has gone badly wrong inside the Demi-Monde, and the US President's daughter has become trapped in this terrible world. It falls to eighteen-year-old Ella Thomas to rescue her, yet once Ella has entered the Demi-Monde she finds that everything is not as it seems, that its cyber-walls are struggling to contain the evil within and that the Real World is in more danger than anyone realises.

2

Could it be Heir Apparent (2002) by Vivian Vande Velde?

From Wikipedia:

Heir Apparent is a science fiction/fantasy novel by young-adult fiction author Vivian Vande Velde, about a girl who becomes trapped inside a looping virtual reality role-playing game called Heir Apparent [...]

Dodging the protesters, she enters the arcade and gets hooked up to Heir Apparent, a single-player RPG in which there are practically endless ways to win or lose. Giannine's character, Janine de St. Jehan, is the illegitimate child of the recently deceased King Cynric, who pronounced her heir to the throne, passing over three legitimate sons.

Her task is to survive the three days (which will only last thirty minutes in the real world) before her coronation. Anytime her character dies, she will automatically be sent back to the beginning of the game.

  • 1
    @Himarm When I answered, you hadn't answered. If I answered a couple of minutes later than you sorry, but I didn't copy your answer. You can see that we both answered 18 hours ago. That means that most likely I answered a couple of minutes later of you – Shevliaskovic Jul 18 '14 at 15:35
  • I just didn't see that you had answered – Shevliaskovic Jul 18 '14 at 15:44
  • @himarm the majority of both questions are quotes from Wikipedia, and what little unique content there is between them falls under the Creative Commons licence. – AncientSwordRage Dec 14 '15 at 19:40
0

I am completely sure this might be incorrect, but posting to help out the asker.

The story you are describing is very similar to Tron (1982). Maybe Tron was made by referring the story that you are telling. I am not sure which it might be, but there you go. The getting stuck inside a game and being created by the father and all reminds me about Tron.

From IMDb:

A computer hacker is abducted into the digital world and forced to participate in gladiatorial games where his only chance of escape is with the help of a heroic security program.

0

The book Heir Apparent fits some of the criteria that you are looking for.

Story summary from Wikipedia:

Heir Apparent is a science fiction/fantasy novel by young-adult fiction author Vivian Vande Velde, about a girl who becomes trapped inside a looping virtual reality role-playing game called Heir Apparent. [...]

Dodging the protesters, she enters the arcade and gets hooked up to Heir Apparent, a single-player RPG in which there are practically endless ways to win or lose. Giannine's character, Janine de St. Jehan, is the illegitimate child of the recently deceased King Cynric, who pronounced her heir to the throne, passing over three legitimate sons.

Her task is to survive the three days (which will only last thirty minutes in the real world) before her coronation. Anytime her character dies, she will automatically be sent back to the beginning of the game.

  • 1
    And what would those criteria be? Can you expand a bit? – SQB Jul 17 '14 at 21:38
-1

Sounds like "Reamde" (2011) by Neal Stephenson.

From Goodreads:

Four decades ago, Richard Forthrast, the black sheep of an Iowa family, fled to a wild and lonely mountainous corner of British Columbia to avoid the draft. Smuggling backpack loads of high-grade marijuana across the border into Northern Idaho, he quickly amassed an enormous and illegal fortune. With plenty of time and money to burn, he became addicted to an online fantasy game in which opposing factions battle for power and treasure in a vast cyber realm. Like many serious gamers, he began routinely purchasing virtual gold pieces and other desirables from Chinese gold farmers—young professional players in Asia who accumulated virtual weapons and armor to sell to busy American and European buyers.

For Richard, the game was the perfect opportunity to launder his aging hundred dollar bills and begin his own high-tech start up—a venture that has morphed into a Fortune 500 computer gaming group, Corporation 9592, with its own super successful online role-playing game, T’Rain. But the line between fantasy and reality becomes dangerously blurred when a young gold farmer accidently triggers a virtual war for dominance—and Richard is caught at the center.

  • 2
    Definitely not REAMDE. There, Zula is the niece of the guy owning the corporation that made the game. There is a plot about a coup by chinese hackers, but this doesn't lead to a lockdown of the game. Nonetheless, it's interesting how many similarities there are between the novel in question and REAMDE :D – Wojciech Morawiec Jul 10 '13 at 0:31
  • -1 It's definitely not REAMDE. No one gets stuck in the game at all. – Discord Jul 16 '13 at 13:02
  • i dont think it deserves -1 for being wrong – Math chiller Dec 17 '13 at 22:11
  • 7
    I didn't DV, but if an answer is flat-out wrong, it absolutely does deserve a DV. The hover text says This answer is not useful. If an answer is wrong (especially to a story-ID Q), then it is certainly not useful – The Fallen Mar 18 '14 at 0:40

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