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I read a short story in a hard back anthology. This was a couple years ago in a college library, and I'm pretty sure the book had been re-bound; so the story could be old, like 80's but I don't know for sure.

In the story, the earth starts to go dark slowly and goes totally dark for three days. The main character avoids the anarchy that ensues when he meets a pack of blind people who have learned to live in darkness.

I think the author was Brazilian, but I'm not 100% sure.

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I read a short story in a hard back anthology. This was a couple years ago in a college library, and I'm pretty sure the book had been re-bound; so the story could be old, like 80's but I don't know for sure.

This is "Darkness" ("Escuridão" in Portuguese) by the Brazilian writer André Carneiro. I have it in Nova 2, a 1972 hardcover anthology edited by Harry Harrison; another possibility is Best SF: 1972 by Harry Harrison and Brian W. Aldiss.

In the story, the earth starts to go dark slowly and goes totally dark

Waldas accepted the reality of the phenomenon a little later than the others. Only on the second day, when everybody was commenting on the growing darkness and the dimming of the lights did he admit it was true. An old lady was shouting that the world was coming to an end. People gathered in little groups, most of them offering metaphysical explanations, mixed with the scientific commentaries from the papers.

for three days.

It was longer than that:

During the early hours of the eighteenth day they were awakened by shouts of joy and animation. One of the refugees who hadn't been able to go to sleep had felt a difference in the atmosphere. He climbed the ladder outside the house.
There was a pale red ball on the horizon.

The main character avoids the anarchy that ensues

Armed with a crowbar from his toolbox, he was leaving his shelter to steal food. It was frightening to think what he might encounter. The darkness had erased all distinctions.

when he meets a pack of blind people who have learned to live in darkness.

The blind men finished distributing the full sacks, suitcases, and boxes for the trip. Waldas, standing still and useless, thought about how many times he had passed these men with their dark glasses, their white canes, their heads fixed, always facing forward. True, he always gave them a brief thought of pity. Ah, if he had only known then how one day they would become the magic protectors, capable of saving other beings, beings made of flesh, muscles, thoughts, and with useless eyes, the same as theirs.

I think the author was Brazilian, but I'm not 100% sure.

He is Brazilian all right. You can read his biography in The Encyclopedia of Science Fiction or (in Portuguese) Wikipedia.

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The story sounds a bit like Isaac Asimov's "Nightfall" (1941). Scientists prepare for the coming of complete darkness on a planet ordinarily illuminated at all times on all sides.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nightfall_%28Asimov_short_story_and_novel%29

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    I've read Nightfall, loved it, but I'm pretty confident it's nothing like OP's story. Besides, Nightfall is a novel, not short story – BBog Jun 17 '13 at 8:37
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    The "Nightfall" novel was adapted (by Robert Silverberg in 1990) from Asimov's 1941 short story. – Chris Peterson Jun 18 '13 at 15:46
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    I see, excuse me then. But the story still doesn't match OP's description. – BBog Jun 18 '13 at 16:37
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    No, it's not Nightfall, though that was my first thought as well. In Nightfall the main point is that this is a planet with multiple suns and they only set at the same time once every few thousand years. The anarchy ensues not from the darkness but from the people's first sight of the stars. – terdon Mar 4 '14 at 1:38
  • Not quite. It's been decades since I read it. There are six stars in the system. The planet goes around one star, but when it's not visible the other stars give off enough light to still prevent a night sky. Once every thousand years or so all but the dimmest star is no longer visible. The citizens then watch in horror as the last star is eclipsed by the planet's moon. Thousands of bright stars appear and everyone goes insane as they're in the midst of a massive star cluster. – Generic Geek Apr 25 '16 at 5:01

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