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After reading the news about Gliese 667 star system I am wondering if any sci-fi author already tried to describe intelligent lifeforms that could evolve on tidal locked planet - facing the sun with one side only the whole time.

I am aware of the movie Halbe Welt but that is dealing with humans reacting to such situation.


Just FYI it looks like Gliese 667 contains three planets in habitable zone and all of them might feature tidal locking. On a very cold planet (Gliesse 667C average temperature might be around -32°C) covered in ice, there can be an equatorial liquid ocean, but the life would have to face constant day, no night.

closed as off-topic by NominSim, Monty129, The Fallen, user1027 Jun 27 '13 at 13:30

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    In Isaac Asimov's Nemesis, there is life on a tidally-locked moon of a gas giant in close orbit around the titular dwarf star. – Sconibulus Jun 27 '13 at 13:14
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In the Golden Age of Science Fiction, it was a scientific fact that the planet Mercury had a permanent dayside and nightside, and it was plausible speculation that the same held for Venus. Thus all the Mercury stories and a fraction of the Venus stories were set on tidally locked worlds, and lots of them had intelligent natives. I will mention two stories by famous writers.

In Stanley G. Weinbaum's 1935 novelette "The Lotus Eaters" (first published in Astounding Stories, April 1935, available at the Internet Archive) planetary explorers discover intelligent plants on the Darkside of a tide-locked Venus.

In Poul Anderson's 1957 novelette "Life Cycle" (first published in The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, July 1957, available at the Internet Archive) the intelligent Mercurians are found mostly in the Twilight Zone.

  • Thanks for answering before the question was closed. – sm4 Jun 28 '13 at 1:18
  • actually Venus retrograde rotation is very slow, so that one venusian day is about 243 earth day, longer than venusian year. But with respect to the sun, it is 117 earth day for one venusian day. – babou Jun 29 '13 at 23:10

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