-1

I was wondering if anyone has any insight on this? As far as I'm aware, The White Council did attack Dol Guldur, But will Saruman be leading this attack and do you think he'll have quite a big role in this storyline? Will there be any signs shown of Saruman searching for the ring? and will there be any signs of Saruman taking interest in his enemies Machines? (Aka, Wanting to Industrialize Isengard?)

To me, I believe The Lord of the Rings simply could not have functioned how well it did without Saruman, I've always had a great interest in this character and it would be due and respectful to only have him as quite a large part/role in the upcoming Dol Guldur battle.

closed as primarily opinion-based by user8719, Stan, Jack B Nimble, Micah, DVK-on-Ahch-To Jul 5 '13 at 17:33

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • VTCing this as "primarily opinion-based". – user8719 Jul 5 '13 at 13:11
2

The only hints we have are from the books. Although Saruman resisted attacking Dol Guldur initially, he did finally relent. Tolkien never said exactly who was in the White Council, nor exactly who attacked Dol Guldur, but I can virtually guarantee that Saruman was among them. If he had insisted on sitting out the attack, I don't think it would have taken 50+ more years for Gandalf to figure out his duplicity.

It's in Saruman's best interest to prevent his own plans from being discovered, which is why he didn't want Dol Guldur attacked. As long as Sauron was residing there, in secret, Saruman was more or less free to search for the ring on his own. As soon as Sauron revealed himself, the White Council would be forced to have other responsibilities (and it became that much more likely that Sauron would be openly looking for the ring).

So if the Council was going to attack Dol Guldur with or without him, his smartest action is to participate.

I wouldn't be surprised if Jackson's Saruman has different ideas, though.

  • Thank-you, I know Jackson has said that he is going a long with the notes that were left of a possible storyline for the White Council, as you say, there was no exact mention of who this council consisted of. Supposedly, The first Uruk(hai?) where seen in Dol Guldur, so it would be nice to see if Saruman does take any particular interest in the movie if these Uruk-hai are sighted (However I have read that they were discreetly removed from Dol Guldur without anyone knowing. I'm sure that no matter what, Christopher Lee will perfect the role any how. – Curunir Jul 5 '13 at 12:38
  • 1
    "It's in Saruman's best interest to prevent his own plans from being discovered, which is why he didn't want Dol Guldur attacked. As long as Sauron was residing there, in secret, Saruman was more or less free to search for the ring on his own" I am reasonably certain that Saruman didn't know the ring wasn't lost forever until after the events of the Hobbit, so this entire section seems wrong. – Anthony Grist Jul 5 '13 at 12:58
  • There was obvious signs for him searching for it, it's said that while he was looking he found Isildurs corpse. It would be one of the logical reasons for Saruman wanting to hold off the attack. – Curunir Jul 5 '13 at 13:04

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.