14

In the movie Iron Man 2, Tony Stark figured out how to synthesize Vibranium. Why didn't he use it to make a new Iron Man armor?

21

Because synthesizing Vibranium still required a source of the raw extraterrestrial ore. There was an implied limit to the availability of Vibranium in the Marvel Cinematic Universe.

  • Captain America's shield was supposed to be all the free Vibranium in the world (Howard Stark says this and we can assume he was an authority on the subject.)

  • This will remain true at least until we discover Wakanda or the Savage Land where other sources of the material have been known to exist in the Marvel Comic Universe.

  • Until relatively recently, the Wakandans lived as their ancestors did, primarily a hunter-gatherer society with some cultivation of crops. Central to the Wakandan's myth and ritual was a small mountain of ore which according to legends fell from the sky. This meteoric ore was later found to be Vibranium, an extraterrestrial metal capable of absorbing all sonic vibrations. -- Wakanda, Marvel Wikia

Comic References

  • In the canon comic universe of Marvel Earth-616, most of the world's Vibranium was found in the hidden kingdom of Wakanda, the home of the Black Panther. Since Wakandan Vibranium is theorized to be an extratrerrestrial material, this may explain why there is a limited amount of the metal on Earth.

  • The Antarctic Vibranium (also known as anti-metal) variant of Vibranium destroys metallic bonds and can only be found in the Savage Land.

  • Captain America's shield is comprised of an Adamantium/Vibranium/Uru alloy, making it one of the most indestructible objects on Marvel Earth.

  • It has not been determined that anyone has been able to create an artificial (i.e. synthesized) version of Vibranium in either the comic or the Marvel Cinematic Universe.

  • One attempt to create an artificial Vibranium created a new material called Reverbium. After attempts at weaponizing it failed, all of the material was presumed destroyed.

Reverbium is an artificial variant to Vibranium created by Sanjani Jaffrey, after most of the world's Vibranium was rendered inert. This variant is imperfect, so rather than absorbing vibrations, it does the opposite, and blows everything away, making it a powerful weapon even in small amounts.

  • The canon comics Iron Man uses Vibranium as a control substance replacing the Palladium core in his Arc Reactor.

  • The Vibranium Mound of Wakanda has been destroyed by the Black Panther to prevent Doctor Doom from gaining control over it.

  • 8
    I don't think that word (synthesizing) means what Marvel thinks it means. – DVK-on-Ahch-To Nov 8 '13 at 2:27
  • 1
    @DVK =^_^= – Izkata Nov 8 '13 at 2:40
  • Agreed! Not a clue... – Thaddeus Howze Nov 8 '13 at 3:02
  • Maybe, then he should steal Captain America's shield.. – Baby Yoda Nov 8 '13 at 3:12
  • 2
    Cap's shield probably isn't even enough for suitcase armor :D – FoxMan2099 Nov 8 '13 at 18:37
4

I don't think Vibranium is mentioned anywhere in IronMan2, he does synthesize a power source. That was based on the cosmic cube, not vibranium

  • Actually while it's never reffered to as Vibranium in the film itself, in the novelization as well as being confirmed by Kevin Feige it is Vibranium, and has nothing to do with the Tessaract (different from the Cosmic Cube also) with the exception that both where related to Howard Stark. – Monty129 Nov 8 '13 at 17:17
  • @Monty129 are you saying the Tesseract is not a Cosmic Cube? Is that confirmed anywhere. I've always equated the two. – FoxMan2099 Nov 8 '13 at 18:36
  • @FoxMan2099 scifi.stackexchange.com/questions/32962/… – Monty129 Nov 8 '13 at 19:36
  • Wait, all you did was link to yourself answering another question on this site! Nice answer, but I think it's safe to say that the "Tesseract" is based on the Cosmic Cube. Someone else even responded with a link to the Marvel Wikia making that exact claim. – FoxMan2099 Nov 8 '13 at 21:46

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.