6

Hogwarts very much like the burrow is a piece of magical architecture that muggles couldn't build and wouldn't respect muggle standards or logic for that matter.

We know that the entrance to the Gryffindor common room is on the 7th floor behind the fat lady's painting, we also know that the dormitories are above the common room.

My question is, considering the wonders of magic, does that mean the Gryffindor tower actually begins at the 7th floor like a giant turret wich base doesn't touch the ground, or does that just mean the first 6 floors have other uses?

Thanks for your input.

  • 3
    I don't recall any canon answer to that, but hopefully @Slytherincess can dredge up some drawing by JKR. Having said that, what would be your plausible reason to think that there's thin air below the common room? Occam's Razor says there's 6 floors used for stuff – DVK-on-Ahch-To Apr 9 '14 at 1:20
  • 3
    If it may be of interest, I imagined Gryffindor Tower as a turret; through the portrait hole one steps from the main castle into the turret, rather like the Headmaster's Tower in the films (harrypotter.wikia.com/wiki/Headmaster%27s_Tower) except being a single turret, rather than three, and with eight (common room and seven dorms) storeys high. Could this be a possibility, or did I miss a clue in the novels to suggest it can't be like this? – Mac Cooper Apr 9 '14 at 12:46
  • I got the same impression Mac. Particularly having seen the films. We'll see what other come up with though. – The Giant of Lannister Apr 9 '14 at 17:46
5

In the film "Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone", Percy Weasley (as Prefect) explains to the new Gryffindor First Years when they first enter the common room that the stairs to the left lead "down and up" to the boys' dormitories, and that the stairs to the right lead "down and up" to the girls' dormitories. As far as the film is concerned at least, there are dormitories both above and below the common room in Gryffindor tower.

2

Since we see the students walking up flights of stairs to get to the entrance to the common room, I think it's reasonable to say that there are other floors in use below the common room.

  • Q: How do you visualize Hogwarts in its entirety? A: A huge, rambling, quite scary-looking castle, with a jumble of towers and battlements. Like the Weasley's house, it isn't a building that Muggles could build, because it is supported by magic. So I'm still thinking it's more of a giant turret with no base to the ground rather than a full fledged tower. We know the dormitories are round, but is there any clues as to the shape of the common room itself? Also I would say there aren't 2 turrets(one for the boys one for the girls)but rather alternatively stacked dormitories, totaling 14 floors. – user24308 Apr 9 '14 at 17:00
  • 1
    I can't really answer for your personal vision of Hogwarts - but there is nothing at all in the books or the movies to suggest a magically "floating" tower. – HorusKol Apr 9 '14 at 22:57
  • Call me crazy but I think a giant turret would make sense for a magical Architect, and er... the Q&A above was JKR's vision of Hogwarts not mine, sorry I should've indicated it – user24308 Apr 10 '14 at 16:47
  • If that is from an interview, then provide it as an answer to your question with links to where you got it from. – HorusKol Apr 10 '14 at 23:38
  • kidsreads.com.asp1-14.dfw1-2.websitetestlink.com/clubs/… it's the 9th question from the bottom of the page – user24308 Apr 11 '14 at 1:50
0

I would like to submit that the entrance to the Gryffindor common room is on the 2nd floor. Based on the fact that they go "up" the stairs to the 3 floor corridor after stunning Neville in book one. They also clearly go upstairs from the Great Hall on the ground floor. Hence the only conclusion is that the entrance to Gryffindor tower is on the 2nd floor and goes up and down from inside.

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