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This question already has an answer here:

Yesterday I re-read the scene from the Two Towers where Aragorn meets Eomer on the plains of Rohan. When Aragorn introduces himself he announces himself as Isildur's heir as well as presenting Anduril since it had been reforged.

In Peter Jackson's movie series the sword is not reforged until The Return of the King when Arwen is dying and Elrond brings the sword to Aragorn so he can summon the Dead Army.

When is the sword reforged in the books?

Is it before the fellowship sets out? This seems like a huge change to the story line, why would Peter choose to create such a discrepancy?

marked as duplicate by Morgan, user8719, NikolaiDante, phantom42, K-H-W Jun 16 '14 at 22:03

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • Hopefully that answer is acceptable for your needs. – Morgan Jun 16 '14 at 21:38
  • That it's not an exact duplicate could be nitpicked over, but I agree that there seems no reason for both questions to exist. – user8719 Jun 16 '14 at 21:51
  • The questions themselves aren't duplicates, but nominsim's answer addresses this question. – phantom42 Jun 16 '14 at 21:55
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From the question: When was the sword of Elendil reforged in Jackson's movie?

From the Tolken's LotR series it is mentioned that the Sword of Elendil was forged anew before Frodo departed from Elrond's house.

In the book it is forged before they depart from Rivendell:

The Sword of Elendil was forged anew by Elvish smiths, and on its blade was traced a device of seven stars set between the crescent Moon and the rayed Sun, and about them was written many runes; for Aragorn son of Arathorn was going to war upon the marches of Mordor. Very bright was that sword when it was made whole again; the light of the sun shone redly in it, and the light of the moon shone cold, and its edge was hard and keen. And Aragorn gave it a new name and called it Andúril, Flame of the West.

By NominSim's answer.

Can't tell you why Jackson changed it, though, except the guess that it signifies some kind of bond between Elrond and Aragorn, or Aragorn fighting as the true king? Makes it more dramatic, I suppose?

  • Feel guilty getting the rep. Haven't even READ the Lord of the Rings. – Mac Cooper Jun 16 '14 at 21:46
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    You pointed Anduril and everyone else in the right direction to get a good answer. That's worth rep. too. – Morgan Jun 16 '14 at 21:50

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