33

Or a turbolaser such as the ones on the surface of the Death Star?

  • 12
    for some reason this gives me the mental image of Luke deflecting a blast from the main weapon of the Death Star. – MD-Tech Sep 30 '14 at 9:17
  • Tie fighter or death star? what's your question! – SaturnsEye Sep 30 '14 at 11:30
  • @MD-Tech: I thought the same thing for a second when I first read this. – James Sheridan Oct 1 '14 at 8:06
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    @SaturnsEye: A TIE Fighter or the turbolaser turrets which lined the Death Star trench in A New Hope. Not the superlaser. – James Sheridan Oct 1 '14 at 8:07
  • I'm at a loss why my answer hasn't been accepted. Can you indicate what more info you feel would be needed? – Valorum Sep 26 '15 at 23:31
25

According to the trailer for the new Star Wars Rebels Season #2, you can indeed deflect a TIE-Fighter blast with a lightsaber.

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  • As this is Disney canon this is enough proof to confirm it. +1 – Alfredo Hernández Apr 19 '15 at 9:06
  • This also happens a couple episodes late when two sith inquisitors clearly deflect blaster fire from a shuttle. Episode 4 if you want to try to link. – Hatandboots Dec 2 '15 at 6:55
  • @Hatandboots - I'll have a look later. Cheers. – Valorum Dec 2 '15 at 8:51
22

In the EU novel Allegiance, Mara Jade uses her lightsaber to block a bolt fired by a scout walker, a considerably smaller vehicle than a Death Star, and similar in size to a TIE Fighter. While she succeeds in deflecting the blast, the kinetic force is so great it nearly wrenches the weapon from her hands. So while it is theoretically possible that a lightsaber could block a blast from a TIE Fighter, it's something that would only work under perfect conditions, and you wouldn't get the chance to block a second shot.

There isn't any particular reason that a person couldn't make a lightsaber large enough to block a blast from a ship-to-ship turbolaser turret, though the power consumption would be problematic. The issue, however, as proven in Allegiance, is the kinetic energy of the blast. A handheld blaster rifle fires a blast that has a very low kinetic energy signature, but a turbolaser is a whole different order of magnitude. It is possible that a strong Jedi, possibly something like a Duinogwuin, could block a small repeater blaster emplacement, like a E-Web (basically the Star Wars version of a Gatling gun) but anything beyond that isn't feasible.

  • Related forum thread from years ago: Heavy Turbo Laser vs Light Saber that makes mention of Children of Jedi books and Dark Empire 2 that might be additional material to hunt down. – user12183 Sep 30 '14 at 1:44
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    Honestly I don't think the difference in kinetic energy is the most significant factor here: I think the physical size of the bolt is the problem. Although I agree the lightsaber could deflect at least part of it, the most likely scenario is that you'd cut straight through the bolt, and the excess would vaporize the poor Jedi who decided to try it. You might succeed, but it wouldn't be worth the attempt – Jason Baker Sep 30 '14 at 1:58
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    @JasonBaker: I thought the same thing, but as I state in my answer, there's no particular reason why you can't just build a bigger lightsaber. – James Sheridan Sep 30 '14 at 2:15
  • Do any games give you the chance to try it? The Force Unleashed and the Jedi Knight series are all I can think of that would have Jedi and TIE Fighters in the same place. Incidentally, Star Wars Trilogy Arcade was never canon, but it does have force feedback when you deflect blaster bolts, same as in Allegiance. – Milo P Sep 30 '14 at 6:44
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    @yrodro: Because it is established in Timothy Zahn's novel that a scout walker's turbolaser has enough kinetic force to wrench Mara Jade's lightsaber out of her grip, even with the assistance of the Force. That's "in-canon." Had the walker, which was on autopilot, elected to fire at her again, she would have been fried. Now, it is conceivable that a stronger Force-user, such as Anakin or Luke Skywalker, Palpatine, or Yoda, may have been able to use the Force to retain their grip on the lightsaber a little better, but such a strong Force-user would likely just use the Force to crush the walker. – James Sheridan Oct 2 '14 at 1:38
5

The canon novel Lords of the Sith suggests that a lightsaber could not only deflect a blaster bolt from a TIE fighter, but from larger ships as well. The wielder does have to deal with the much higher kinetic energy from such a bolt, though:

Noses down, the freighters began firing from blaster cannons mounted on the top and bottom of the ships, long red lines that exited the ship in superheated pulses. Trees one hundred meters from Vader and the Emperor exploded into splinters under the onslaught, and the lines cut a rapid path along the clearing toward them, putting a patchwork of smoking holes in the earth, closing in on Vader.

One with the Force, Vader held his ground and tensed for impact. Then he exploded into motion, his lightsaber humming as he spun it rapidly left and right, deflecting the powerful blaster shots off into the forest, shattering still more trees, destroying the tents, but sparing the communications array. The kinetic energy from the shots drove him backward, his boots putting furrows in the soft soil.

The Royal Guards, momentarily taken by surprise, recovered enough to plant blaster rifles against their shoulders. They fired at the freighters as the large ships sped over and past them, but the personal weapons did no harm to the shielded and armored ships.

- Lords of the Sith, p. 168

The freighter type is not identified, but they are described as "large ships" and they have top/bottom blaster cannons like the Millennium Falcon, so they are probably comparable in size and armament to the Falcon (which is much larger than a TIE fighter and able to destroy one with a single blast).

-15

No.

Laser beams are light, by definition. You can't see light coming at you. Once you see it, it already hit you. At least in this universe and with the physics we know.

  • 2
    But is the physics we know in our universe consistent with the physics the Star Wars universe knows? I feel like the answer is "No". – Shisa Sep 30 '14 at 11:54
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    Ah, but the problem is with "the physics we know". LucasPhysics do not behave normally. How do you think Jedi deflect normal bolts? – The Fallen Sep 30 '14 at 11:54
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    Except the question isn't "Can a jedi (or other person) react to a laser blast in time to deflect it." It's "Can a lightsaber deflect a laser blast." If I turn a lightsaber on and mount it in a clasp, then aim a laser blaster from a tie fighter at the lightsaber beam and fire, what would happen? – Doc Sep 30 '14 at 19:38
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    @Jens - I am perfectly aware of what a laser is, the problem is, there are veeeery few instances of actual lasers in Star Wars, and TIE Fighters are not one of them. In addition, the others pointed out that Jedi react before the blast, so your answer is wrong on multiple counts. Like it or not. – The Fallen Sep 30 '14 at 20:50
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    This reminds me of my own answer to another question, which was along the lines of "are there any real lasers in the Star Wars universe. I felt I was undeservedly downvoted into oblivion for stating that there wasn't. This answer, on the other hand, completely fails to accounts for the fact that blaster bolts and turbolasers, while called lasers, have as much in common with real-life lasers as mechanised war vehicles have in common with the water "tanks" after which they are named. – James Sheridan Oct 1 '14 at 8:02

protected by Community Oct 2 '14 at 1:15

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