0

Before getting into this I understand that in the transition from book to television the producers had to make changes from the books.

Okay.

In the books Robb married Jeyne Westerling and eventually she conceived a child. Robb attended Edmure Tully's wedding and was brutally murdered, Jeyne didn't attend and was alive afterwards. Later in the series Jaime meets Jeyne and her mother and he askes if she's carrying Robb's child, she says she took care of it and presumably Jeyne had some moon tea.

Personally I think this would have been a great opportunity for Martin to throw in a twist to the readers, but I just don't know how he'd do it now. What I thought when I read it originally was that the mother made her daughter abort her baby, no. I thought that wasn't her daughter, Jaime has probably never met Jeyne before and no one (of importance to the situation) would be the wiser.

When they changed the character Jeyne Westerling to Talisa Maegry in the show, then killed her off I was wondering what would happen in the books. I know that they are two different things but they can't have something major like Jeyne actually being pregnant happen in the books but not the show.

I'm just curious what some other peoples views on this are, or if anyone has any ideas on how they're going to play it off.

closed as primarily opinion-based by Izkata, Valorum, Ward, Shevliaskovic, Stan Oct 19 '14 at 11:18

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • 1
    they can't have something major like Jeyne actually being pregnant happen in the books but not the show - You're not used to movie/tv adaptations are you? That's a pretty minor change. – Izkata Oct 18 '14 at 22:32
  • My guess would be that they did not want loose ends that they did not intend to follow up on (i.e. a possible child of Robb's). This way it is a clean break from the Robb story line and viewers are not confused. – TLP Oct 18 '14 at 23:35
  • 4
    Though this has potential to be opinion-based, it has been answered with information from interviews with the creators/writers, so worth leaving open. – Shisa Oct 19 '14 at 1:35
  • 1
    See here: movies.stackexchange.com/questions/11677/… – Shisa Oct 19 '14 at 1:40
  • Also gameofthrones.wikia.com/wiki/… – Shisa Oct 19 '14 at 1:43
4

Please, read this interview with George R.R Martin about the Red Wedding and his motivations when he wrote it for the books and when he collaborated in the TV show adaptation.

See his own words:

The next predictable thing is to think his eldest son is going to rise up and avenge his father. And everybody is going to expect that. So immediately [killing Robb] became the next thing I had to do.

Basically, he didn't want to be predictable. He didn't want readers to think that

Robb's son would come back eventually to avenge his father's death.

So that's are his motivations and considerations for twists about that topic.

  • 5
    The OP seems to be asking about the change to Jeyne and not Robb's or his son's fate. – Shisa Oct 19 '14 at 1:38
  • 1
    @Shisa, you are right, and is my understanding that she concedes that those kind of changes often need to be made in the transition from book to film in her question, but she enquires about a missing opportunity for a twist by doing so. In order to answer why that change, I need to explain author motivations, especially about being predictable and leaving looses ends. – Kreann Oct 19 '14 at 14:11

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.