14

I do believe that Severus knew he was in danger in the Shrieking Shack. Harry even wondered if he sensed danger. Voldemort said to him,

I have thought long and hard, Severus… do you know why I have called you back from the battle?

If you put two and two together, Snape must have known that he was in danger. He must have known that the fight was almost over, because Dumbledore told him to tell Harry (indirectly) that he was a horcrux. He had orders, so why couldn’t he just disapparate into the castle?

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    Good question, if I had to guess I'd say Voldemort is smart enough to cast an 'Aura of Anti-Disapparation' – Crow T Robot Nov 29 '14 at 17:13
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    I agree, Snape knew what was going to happen, but he also knew he was playing a role in keeping Harry alive, he had to let Voldemort believe that he would become master of the Elder wand if he won it from Snape. Snape is much braver and knows what needs to be done for the greater good – BP_Phoenix Dec 1 '14 at 9:05
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    @BP_Phoenix "for the greater good", nice. – mikeazo Dec 2 '14 at 14:21
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    @JohnP, I believe the correct quote is "Being me has its advantages". There's nothing to suggest that Dumbledore's ability to bypass the restriction against Apparition was something automatically granted to all headmasters. – Harry Johnston Jul 21 '18 at 22:46
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    ... and even if it is, technically Snape had abdicated. – Harry Johnston Jul 21 '18 at 22:52
15

short answer:

Because (like Harry) Snape was supposed to die by Voldemort's hand (all part of Dumbledore's plan)

Both Harry and Snape must only find out about their inevitable deaths at the last moment, because both Harry and Snape might not have the strength to accept their impending deaths.

deathly hollows chapter the prince's tale

“Harry must not know, not until the last moment, not until it is necessary, otherwise how could he have the strength to do what must be done?”

Long answer (and a vindication for Snape)

Note that there is nothing in canon about what was inside Snape's mind in the Shrieking Shack.This will be speculation of Snape's thoughts based on the sequence of events in the shack and Snape's memories in the Pensieve

  1. Snape was looking at the enchanted cage around Nagini when he realized that Dumbledore's plan has come true - Voldemort was now protecting Nagini. - Snape must now tell Harry that he is also a horcrux.

deathly hollows chapter the prince's tale (scene where Harry was looking at Snape's memories in the Pensieve)

There will come a time when Lord Voldemort will seem to fear for the life of his snake.”

“For Nagini?” Snape looked astonished.

“Precisely. If there comes a time when Lord Voldemort stops sending that snake forth to do his bidding, but keeps it safe beside him under magical protection, then, I think, it will be safe to tell Harry.”

deathly Hollows chapter the elder wand (scene where Harry was spying on Snape and Voldemort)

And for a moment Harry saw Snape’s profile: His eyes were fixed upon the coiling snake in its enchanted cage. “No, my Lord, but I beg you will let me return. Let me find Potter.”

  1. Then Voldemort started talking about how the Elder wand was not doing extraordinary magic. Hinting that the wand does not recognize him as it's master.

deathly hollows chapter the elder wand

“I sought a third wand, Severus. The Elder Wand, the Wand of Destiny, the Deathstick. I took it from its previous master. I took it from the grave of Albus Dumbledore.”

And now Snape looked at Voldemort, and Snape’s face was like a death mask. It was marble white and so still that when he spoke, it was a shock to see that anyone lived behind the blank eyes...

...“Perhaps you already know it? You are a clever man, after all, Severus. You have been a good and faithful servant, and I regret what must happen.”

“My Lord —”

“The Elder Wand cannot serve me properly, Severus, because I am not its true master. The Elder Wand belongs to the wizard who killed its last owner.

  1. Then and only then, did Snape realize - this was also part of Dumbledore's plan (why Dumbledore said “...You must kill me.”)

deathly hollows chapter the princes tale (scene Snape and Dumbledore talking about Malfoy)

...of course, there is only one thing to be done if we are to save him from Lord Voldemort’s wrath.”

Snape raised his eyebrows and his tone was sardonic as he asked,

“Are you intending to let him kill you?”

“Certainly not. You must kill me.

  1. Snape must have realized, he too must die in order to make Voldemort believe that his death will make Voldemort the true master of the Elder Wand.

    (why is it necessary for Voldemort to believe? So that Voldemort will not ask anybody else to kill Harry, Voldemort must be led to believe that that killing Dubledore's killer (Snape) will make him the master of the Unbeatable Wand. A wand that he can use to finally defeat and kill Harry.)

Deathly Hollows chapter the prince's tale

“So the boy . . . the boy must die?” asked Snape quite calmly.

“And Voldemort himself must do it, Severus. That is essential.”

  1. Snape must have also realized that Dumbledore did not trust him to calmly accept sacrificing himself. (same as Harry)

deathly hollows chapter the prince's tale

“Harry must not know, not until the last moment, not until it is necessary, otherwise how could he have the strength to do what must be done?”

  1. Snape must have realized he is in the same boat as Harry. The full extent of Dumbledore's plan - for both of them to die - and for both of them to realize the necessity of their death, only at the last moment.

  2. Snape must have also realized that since Voldemort called him here to kill him, then Voldemort is already prepared for any escape he might attempt.

So Snape could not disapparate because he was conflicted - he realizes that he must die for Dumbledore's plan to work - but he still has to tell Harry that he is also a horcrux.

Additional Edits slightly off topic - for Dumbledore's thought process:

Some canon background first.

from deathly Hollows chapter: King's Cross

“But you expected him to go after the wand?”

“I have been sure that he would try, ever since your wand beat Voldemort’s in the graveyard of Little Hangleton. At first, he was afraid that you had conquered him by superior skill. Once he had kidnapped Ollivander, however, he discovered the existence of the twin cores.

...naturally set out to find the one wand that, they said, would beat any other.

...He believes that the Elder Wand removes his last weakness and makes him truly invincible. Poor Severus . . .”

.

from Half-blood prince chapter Draco's Detour (Note Dumbledore still alive)

“Talking of Diagon Alley,” said Mr. Weasley, “looks like Ollivander's gone too.

“The wandmaker?” said Ginny, looking startled.

“That’s the one. Shop’s empty. No sign of a struggle. No one knows whether he left voluntarily or was kidnapped.”

My interpretation: As early as "Goblet of Fire" (while Dumbledore was still alive) Dumbledore is sure that Voldemort will go after the wand. And Ollivander's abduction reinforced the idea that Voldemort was looking for a wand to defeat and kill Harry.

Now for the speculation of Dumbledore's plans and scenarios (in Dumbledore's mind):

Short Answer: Dumbledore intends to turn the Elder wand (Unbeatable wand) into a trap for Voldemort

Long Answer (with scenarios):

Voldemort steals the wand from Dumbledore's grave (thinking and "believing" that stealing the wand will be enough to make him the wand's master).

  • end results:

  • Snape would "not" have to die (preferable outcome - in Dumbledore's mind).

  • Voldemort won't order anybody else to kill Harry. Voldemort "believes" that he owns the Unbeatable Wand and Voldemort himself will want to kill Harry (which is the essential part of Dumbledore's plan).

Voldemort steals the wand "but" eventually deduces that he needs to kill Snape (Dumbledore's killer) to gain the Unbeatable Wand's loyalty.

  • end results:

  • Snape has to die (regrettable to Dumbledore's mind of course, but necessary)

  • Voldemort won't order anybody else to kill Harry. Voldemort "believes" that he owns the Unbeatable Wand and Voldemort himself will want to kill Harry (which is the essential part of Dumbledore's plan).

on another tack:

Malfoy succeeds in killing Dumbledore, then Voldemort steals the wand "but" eventually deduces that he needs to kill Malfoy (Dumbledore's killer) to gain the wands loyalty.

  • end results:

  • Snape would "not" have to die (fortunate for Snape).

  • Voldemort won't order anybody else to kill Harry. Voldemort "believes" that he owns the Unbeatable Wand and Voldemort himself will want to kill Harry (which is the essential part of Dumbledore's plan).

But, Dumbledore cannot allow an innocent child (Malfoy) to die for his plan. That is "one of the reasons" (but not the "only" reason) why he "asked" Snape to kill him.

Additional Edit 3: slightly off topic

With regards to Dumbledore's intent on whether Snape should own the wand after Dumbledore's death (see the quotes below for reference)

Deathly Hallows chapter the Flaw in the plan

“He killed —”

“Aren’t you listening? Snape never beat Dumbledore! Dumbledore’s death was planned between them! Dumbledore intended to die undefeated, the wand’s last true master! If all had gone as planned, the wand’s power would have died with him, because it had never been won from him!”

.

Deathly Hallows chapter King's Cross

He believes that the Elder Wand removes his last weakness and makes him truly invincible. Poor Severus . . .”

“If you planned your death with Snape, you meant him to end up with the Elder Wand, didn’t you?”

“I admit that was my intention,” said Dumbledore, “but it did not work as I intended, did it?”

“No,” said Harry. “That bit didn’t work out.”

The discrepancy is whether Dumbledore intended Snape to be the wand's master.

My speculation is the first quote should take precedence since it is more specific.

The second quote should actually be read as “If you planned your death with Snape, you meant him (Voldemort) to end up with the Elder Wand, didn’t you?”

I realize using the word "him" in the second quote is confusing based on this thread What were Dumbledore's actual intentions for the Elder Wand? intentions-for-the-elder-wand

No, I'm not a grammar teacher nor a book editor :)

My speculation is that it was only in King's Cross chapter that Harry realized that Voldemort was supposed to end up with the wand. Harry also needed to confirm this with Dumbledore since only Dumbledore has the complete specifics of his own plan.

Harry realized that Dumbledore planned to turn the wand into a trap. A trap designed to exploit Voldemort's desire to get an Unbeatable wand to kill Harry.

On another tack:

Dumbledore has a reason not to reveal to Snape his entire plan:

Deathly Hallows chapter The Prince's tale (Pensieve scene Snape and Dumbledore talking)

“I prefer not to put all of my secrets in one basket, particularly not a basket that spends so much time dangling on the arm of Lord Voldemort.”

“Which I do on your orders!”...

and

Deathly Hallows chapter The Prince's tale (Pensieve scene Snape and Dumbledore talking)

“After you have killed me, Severus —”

“You refuse to tell me everything, yet you expect that small service of me!” snarled Snape, and real anger flared in the thin face now. “You take a great deal for granted, Dumbledore! Perhaps I have changed my mind!”

“You gave me your word, Severus. And while we are talking about services you owe me, I thought you agreed to keep a close eye on our young Slytherin friend?”

Snape looked angry, mutinous. Dumbledore sighed.

“Come to my office tonight, Severus, at eleven, and you shall not complain that I have no confidence in you. . . .”

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    Well written up, but Dumbledore's plan for the elder wand was for it to be nobodies master- Dumbledore asked Snape to kill him so he would die unvanquished, this went wrong when Draco disarmed him. Based on that (and the fact that the alternative is evil), I don't think Dumbledore intended Snape to die. I'm on mobile so I cant find the quote, but I believe this is discussed in 'Kings cross'. – Crow T Robot Dec 2 '14 at 14:26
  • @Crow T Robot Kindly elaborate on the purpose of Dumbledore dying unvanguished (does it stop Voldemort from killing Snape). Also please elaborate "(and the fact that the alternative is evil)" – tls Dec 3 '14 at 1:32
  • Your answer was written nicely. Obvious research has been put into it, etc, etc. Your answer about Severus's death being planned by Dumbledore is purely speculation. All canon answers you stated in quotes are for other people; Harry and Dumbledore. For this reason, i do not see this making sense. However, It was said in the chapter Kings Cross. "If you planned your death with Snape, you meant him to end up with the Elder Wand, didn't you?" " I admit that was my intention," – Jake Dec 4 '14 at 1:31
  • @Jake Kindly elaborate on the purpose of Dumbledore dying unvanquished (does it stop Voldemort from killing Snape) – tls Dec 4 '14 at 8:54
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    I finally found the quote I think @CrowTRobot was talking about, Deathly Hallows, Ch36, Harry says to Voldemort, "Aren’t you listening? Snape never beat Dumbledore! Dumbledore’s death was planned between them! Dumbledore intended to die undefeated, the wand’s last true master! If all had gone as planned, the wand’s power would have died with him, because it had never been won from him!" – mikeazo Dec 5 '14 at 12:43
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Since I disagree with the idea that Snape's death was planned by Dumbledore, I'm going to suggest an alternative and far simpler solution. You've said "Snape must have known he was in danger", and therefore he should have fled. But you neglect to consider that Snape was constantly betraying a mind-reading, sadistic, extremely powerful dark wizard who showed zero mercy to both his followers and his enemies. Snape was always in danger.

If he had been the type to break, or panic, Snape would have been killed long ago. Every single time he met Voldemort he must have had to fight the creeping paranoia.

What if he knows...

Every time he began a sadistic monologue describing how he treated traitors, or talked about how Snape was so loyal...

What if he knows...

Every time he began to raise his wand...

What if he knows...

In short, while Snape is around Voldemort every single breath could be his last, and he knows it. The sort of man who would have Disapparated when Voldemort began to get sinister would never have been able to infiltrate his ranks, or convince him he was still loyal after 14 years of working for Albus Dumbledore (can you even imagine that conversation?).

It is for this reason that Harry describes him as the bravest man he ever knew, and it is for this reason that he didn't Disapparate from the Shack that night.

1

Well there are several reasons for him not Disapparating in the Shrieking Shack.

If you consider only the books, then he simply couldn't disapparate. In the Half Blood Prince when Harry and Dumbledore go to destroy the Horcrux, Dumbledore himself can't disapparate from the inside, having to go to Hogsmeade to do so. He claims that no one, not even the headmaster can do this.

Regarding only the movies, the disapparating rule is dismissed for the headmasters, Dumbledore says to Harry that being headmaster has certain perks. At the time of Severus encounter he was still headmaster so apparently he could disapparate. Why he didn't I agree with @BP_Phoenix 's explanation, that he must make the ultimate sacrifice.

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    I may be wrong but I am sure the Shrieking Shack is in Hogsmeade where there are not disapparating restrictions, so being headmaster is not relevant here? :-) – BP_Phoenix Dec 1 '14 at 10:59
  • Ohh, yeah, I guess you are right. So yeah your answer is just spot on. I just got confused. – Comum Dec 1 '14 at 11:09
  • I do realize I said, "Why could he just Disapparate into the castle?" I'm not about to edit my answer, and waste everybody's time, however, what about apparation into Hogsmead? He could then use a sort of apparation. This is far fetched, but i'm just curious. – Jake Dec 2 '14 at 0:48
  • I think this is the correct answer. The Shrieking Shack was in Hogsmeade, but it was nonetheless part of the Hogwarts, and therefore covered by the restrictions against apparition and disapparition. Severus was headmaster, and could lift the restrictions given time, but he didn't have enough time. And even in the movies I believe the quote was "Being me has its advantages", not "being headmaster". – Harry Johnston Jul 21 '18 at 22:44
  • Also relevant. – Harry Johnston Jul 21 '18 at 22:52

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