10

Introduction

When I was a teenager, I subscribed to a Star Wars Comic book, translated into Swedish. In one issue, there was a story that took place some short time after the Battle of Yavin, about a Rebel pilot who, for some unknown reason, was grounded during the battle and his X-wing was instead given to Luke Skywalker.

This made him bitter (for having missed the most glorious battle in the history of the Rebel Alliance) and hostile towards Luke (the brat who'd stolen his ship and his glory). The story goes on to him wanting to prove himself just as good as Skywalker.

I can't remember the character's name and very little of his appearance (which was generic), but I do recall him being human.

Neither can I remember the issue or name of the comic book (If I had, it would probably be a Swedish name and do you no good anyway).

Questions

I would love answers to all questions, but anyone of them will be good enough.

  1. Who am I talking about?
  2. Is this event considered to be any level of canon? If so, which?
  3. Which comic book and issue does this story take place in?
  • 1
    No, it's not canon. The only true canon now is the 6 feature films, the Clone Wars TV series and film and the Rebels TV series. Everything else is considered a "legend". – Valorum Dec 17 '14 at 13:38
  • Sorry, meant to ask which level of canon, if any. Will update. – Gunnar Södergren Dec 17 '14 at 13:39
  • If it's a comic, it's almost certainly licensed which means that it's "Legends" canon. – Valorum Dec 17 '14 at 13:40
  • "Legends" isn't even canon, really. They're just some nice stories that are floating around the galaxy... – BBlake Dec 17 '14 at 18:31
10

In the comic Vader's Quest, published in 1999, Red 5 pilot, Jal Te Gniev is grounded for the Battle of Yavin due to measles. He was replaced by Luke Skywalker.

Per Wookieepedia:

However, he did not participate in the Battle of Yavin due to measles. His X-wing was borrowed by Luke Skywalker. Gniev felt great hatred towards Skywalker because he felt as though he had been denied his rightful glory in destroying the first Death Star, especially considering he had flown thirty-one missions for the Alliance.

I can find no reference to ever wanting to necessarily prove himself as good as Skywalker. But after blaming him and being partly responsible for the death of innocents because of his hatred for Skywalker, he chooses to help save Luke.

With Bobek's death, Gniev reevaluated himself and set out to save Luke Skywalker, whose life he had placed in extreme jeopardy.

Gniev then acquired a Z-95 Headhunter which he flew to Jazbina to save Skywalker. Skywalker, meanwhile, had become entangled with Lord Prepredenko and Princess Syayna. Upon the arrival of Darth Vader and a Interdictor who prevented anyone to flee the planet, the situation on Jazbina looked grim. Gniev landed on the planet and joined the efforts of Skywalker and Syayna to save the planet. Using Skywalker's X-wing, Gniev flew into space to attack the Interdictor.

Originally, the comic was C-Canon, as were most EU materials. Since the canon purge earlier this year, this comic is considered part of The Legends Canon

  • That's it, it's definitely Jal. Thank you! As to the "proving himself as good as" part, this was just a faulty recollection of mine: I remembered him crashing an X-Wing and being punished for it, but not why he did it. – Gunnar Södergren Dec 17 '14 at 13:57
  • 1
    It's all good. It happens. Glad we were able to help find the comic for you. The quote that Richard found definitely implies that he resented the attention garnished on Luke, so your memory wasn't completely without cause. – phantom42 Dec 17 '14 at 13:59
  • Measles still exists in the Star Wars universe? Couldn't they be bothered to come up with something more exotic? Bantha flu or nerf pox? – Jay Dec 17 '14 at 20:17
  • Yavinese Measels? – Dronz Dec 17 '14 at 21:22
4

This is Jal Gniev who appears in the four book comic series; Vader's Quest.

He was grounded due to measles and missed the Battle of Yavin. His X-Wing was given to Luke. Suffice to say, he's quite grumpy about this and has a series of misadventures in his (ultimately successful) attempt to prove himself a worthwhile individual.

As far as "canon status" is concerned, since only the 6 feature films, The Clone Wars and Rebels are considered part of the true canon, this falls under the heading of "Legends", licensed but able to be ignored by the writers.

enter image description here

enter image description here

enter image description here

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.