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I have just read Stephen Baxter's PROXIMA. Early on in the the novel they mention that the protagonist's name "Yuri Eden" is not his real name. Yuri is the nickname he was given on Mars, Eden is the name of the Mars colony he lived in.

Over the course of the novel I began to suspect that he might be the original Robert Braemann. But this is only a speculation.

Is his real name mentioned in the novel or have I missed something?

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We haven't found out his first name, but we do know (from the sequel; Ultima, Proxima #2) that Yuri Eden is in fact the son of Robert Braemann:

‘Because one of my donors was a man called Robert Braemann [said Earthshine]. I am him, but more than Braemann alone … I, he, was one of the most notorious of the Heroic Generation, the criminals who saved the world from the climate Jolts. I sought to save myself, my family, from the witch hunt we all knew would follow. So I allowed my self to be downloaded into the Earthshine project. My wife was already dead, and so she was beyond their reach. But we had a son, nineteen years old. In the year 2086 I had him placed in cryogenic storage—’ ‘My God. You’re talking about Yuri Eden.’

‘His true surname was Braemann. His forename – well, he deserves his privacy.’

‘But that means that Beth Eden Jones—’

‘Is my granddaughter. And Mardina, my great-granddaughter. I told Beth my true name, as we fled from the death of the solar system. I wasn’t even sure if Yuri had ever told her the truth about himself. Well, he had. She understood immediately.’

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I got the impression from what Yuri tells us of the heroic age, and the last conversation he has with his daughter Beth that although he is the "son" of Robert Braemann, he is actually a genetic clone of Robert Braemann, possibly complete with Robert Braemann's memories as well... something about being engineered and his parents seeking a method of immortality. It's been a while since I've read Proxima, however...

Some of the information contained in this post requires additional references. Please edit to add citations to reliable sources that support the assertions made here. Unsourced material may be disputed or deleted.

  • Welcome to SFFSE! You propose an interesting argument, but if you could cite sources (say quotes perhaps) to support your argument it would be greatly improved! – Often Right Aug 8 '15 at 3:53

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