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If I recall correctly, a young boy would contort his body and/or limbs into nearly impossible postures which triggered an out of body experience and allowed him to travel to other dimensions to interact with the native beings there... he discovered these positions in a book of his own...

Roughly, I read this around the age of 10, so it was about 22 years ago or so.. 1990-95? - It was in English. I have no memory of the cover... It was probably young adult reading and I do remember there were names to these poses he would do. The names of the poses had different names that were not in English. I am reminded of the martial arts poses or series of movements in karate called "katas".

  • What is "OOBE"? Roughly speaking, when did you read this? What language was it in? Did it seem to be a translation? Do you have any memories of the cover? Did it seem to have a target age-range for readers? Even tiny details could help us find this for you. – phantom42 Feb 4 '15 at 15:06
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    Just to rule out outside possibilities, this isn't J.H. Brennan's Barmy Jeffers and the Quasimodo Walk (deletionpedia.org/en/Barmy_Jeffers)? Barmy's travels are triggered by a sort of walk, and he actually goes there, but it seemed like a partial match. – FuzzyBoots Feb 4 '15 at 15:17
  • @phantom42 - Thanks for replying. OOBE= Out of body experience. Roughly, i read this around the age of 10, so it was about 22 years ago or so.. 1990-95? - it was in English, no memory of the cover... probably young adult reading and i do remember there were names to these poses he would do. the names of the poses had different names that were not in english, i am reminded of the martial arts poses or series of movements in karate called , "katas" ? – pocholo Feb 4 '15 at 15:54
  • @SeanDuggan - Thanks, but nope no dice. Cool story though. – pocholo Feb 4 '15 at 15:57
  • @pocholo Thanks. You should edit some of that info you remember into the question as not everyone will read the comments. Now, let's see if we can find this. – phantom42 Feb 4 '15 at 16:08
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Perhaps The Boy Who Reversed Himself (1986) by William Sleator?

Not finding much about "poses", but in the book one could get to the fourth dimension by learning to step 'ana' or 'kata' (the extra directions added to make it 4D). "Ana" and "kata" are the ancient Greek words for "up" and "down," respectively.

TVTropes:

The title character of The Boy Who Reversed Himself is part of a family with a secret: they hold the knowledge of how to move in the directions of ana and kata, the fourth dimensional equivalent of up and down. The story deals extensively with the ramifications of what this would allow one to do: Just as a stick figure who learned to rise off a page and into the third dimension could step over two-dimensional barriers and access the inside of closed two-dimensional shapes, a three-dimensional person able to rise into the fourth dimension can access the insides of closed objects and pass through barriers with ease. The drawback? When you fold back into 3-space, you tend to inadvertently reverse yourself, down to the molecular level (which results in some strangeness like ketchup acting as a powerful mind-altering drug). The only way to fix it is a second exhausting trip into 4-space. And then there's the bigger problem: 4-space has residents.

Wiki summary:

A high school girl named Laura grows suspicious when a report of hers appears in mirror writing, and Omar, the weird boy next door, makes it go back to normal. Furthermore, he seems to be parting his hair on a different side than usual. He first refuses to explain what's going on, but after she repeatedly coaxes him, he reveals that he has access to the fourth dimension, where he accidentally "reversed" himself. He eventually allows her to visit it under his supervision, but he warns her that it is extremely dangerous and that he is violating some agreement by letting her in on the secret. She tries to use her access to the higher dimension to impress Pete, a popular boy she wants to go to the school dance with, but after she seems to disappear into thin air and unlock a door from the other side, Pete realizes something funny is going on, and she feels pressured to show him the truth, without Omar's knowledge. When she brings Pete into four-space, they lose their way and end up as the captives of four-dimensional creatures. Unfortunately, she determines that escaping might threaten the very existence of her own world by making the powerful 4-D creatures aware of it. With Omar's help, she finds a safe way out and learns the truth about how he came to know about other dimensions.

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