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I remember only last part of comic book:

  • There is a scene of attack (in space) against aliens, hero is flying space shuttle.
  • He return to active duty, there is a war with enigmatic aliens, after hospital he is trained in virtual reality environment
  • Main planet of aliens is spotted and humans send ship against it, journey in one direction takes several years, hibernation is needed.
  • Near alien planet ship is hitted by meteor or advanced alien stealth rocket.
  • Humans fight with aliens and use generators which slows down time/movements (now I know it was stasis field, inside it fight with melee weapon started, remember Einstein quote about next war after third world war) it makes rifles and lasers useless, instead of it humans use bows and swords, the year is around 3000DC
  • After battle hero backs to Earth (50 or more passed), now it seems that there is peace between aliens and humans
  • Faces of aliens are not shown even one time I think, they are humanoid and in space suits

marked as duplicate by Edlothiad, Politank-Z, Bellatrix, TheLethalCarrot, BMWurm May 4 '18 at 8:04

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  • I remember only twisted parts ;) I think it was a single volume – Qbik Feb 24 '15 at 21:44
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    This is the store of Joe Halderman's The Forever War (a novel that ever SF fan should read), but I don't know the comic. – dmckee Feb 24 '15 at 22:11
  • @dmckee this is it ! I'm shocked that such short description is enought – Qbik Feb 24 '15 at 22:16
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    Short? That is admirably terse, but very complete. – dmckee Feb 24 '15 at 22:18
  • @dmckee there is an comic book also : en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Forever_War_%28comics%29 please post it as an answer – Qbik Feb 24 '15 at 22:25
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The story you've laid out is that of Joe Haldeman's classic and Nebula Award winning The Forever War, which was originally (1974) a short novel.

There is a graphic novel version from 1988.

The novel is sometimes touted as a response to Heinlein's Starship Troopers, and certainly presents a more cynical view of the motives and behavior of the military command at the strategic and political level while retaining a strong focus on the experience of the individual soldier (Haldeman had served in Vietnam)

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