2

Anti-gravity hair-gel may be required. I've noticed that some of the women (such as senators and diplomats) in the prequels wear metallic "nets" or frames around their heads, but I'm not sure if that's for a structural purpose or for decoration. In other cases it's a ponytail where their hair is infuriatingly short for such hair styles. Is this just bad work with animation/wigs or some dark female magic? (I'm a female and I still haven't worked it out!) I was wondering if there was any speculation for how it would work in the real world.

P.s, The kind-of hair we're talking about here is "Queen Amidala's decoy"'s hair, which is so excessive it manages to make Princess Leia's hair in "A New Hope" look TAME! ;)

P.p.s: in series 3 episode 11 of Star Wars The Clone Wars ("Pursuit of Peace"), one of Padme's assistants is seen offering a wig/already complete hairstyle to Padme. It would appear some cheating is involved!

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    I'm not really sure what you're asking. Can you provide a screenshot to indicate what we're supposed to be looking at?
    – Valorum
    Jun 1 '15 at 20:53
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    women with fancy hair that stays in place, use a form of magic, which is unknown to us lesser mortals, and others can only dream of.
    – Himarm
    Jun 1 '15 at 20:56
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    They can construct miles-long spaceships, destroy planets, and have cities covering entire planets. Their hair products are probably similarly advanced :-).
    – LAK
    Jun 1 '15 at 21:00
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    Given that these hairdos weren't done with CGI, is there a need for an in-universe explanation different from real-world hair-styling technologies? E.g. gel, hair spray, hair irons, ties, metal frames, combs, pins, etc. The hairstyle referenced isn't really any more impossible than many elaborate traditional hairstyles (particularly those of Japanese and French women: upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/a/ac/… 3.bp.blogspot.com/-H2ovC4f2gNQ/TVnCGRsaVFI/AAAAAAAAO-k/…). Jun 1 '15 at 21:36
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    The people with such hair tend to have titles like "Queen"... So is "servants" a suitable answer?
    – TZHX
    Jun 1 '15 at 22:16
9

Sabé sported a number of exciting hairstyles during the Star Wars films, most memorably this free-standing (and highly impractical) confection:

enter image description here Luckily (for younger fans) there was a how-to guide provided with one of the action dolls to show you how the 'look' can be achieved.

enter image description here

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    Gah, Keira looks so young in those pictures!
    – Martha
    Jun 1 '15 at 21:28
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    So no anti-gravity technology needed, just strong necks and wide/tall door frames. Jun 1 '15 at 21:44
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    And to think that people say the Star Wars movies stopped offering progressive female roles for young girls to identify with after Leia. Nonsense! Jun 2 '15 at 11:54
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    @pauld.waite - Padme was quite a good role model in the first film, then became progressively more helpless and incompetent as the series went on.
    – Valorum
    Jun 2 '15 at 12:39
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    No, pretty much all love is stupid. :)
    – BBlake
    Jun 2 '15 at 17:52
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I think an important part of the question is that these are typically higher-class women--senators and diplomats, as you say. They can likely afford hairdressers (among other luxuries) that let them have these more impractical hair styles. Amidala's handmaidens were likely not just for show, but because she would need help doing her hair and clothing. This is similar to other ladies in waiting (and of course servants). If you think of the French court (http://www.huffingtonpost.com/will-bashor/marie-antoinettes-crazies_b_4109620.html has some great images of Marie Antoinette), these were women in a potentially similar situation, with not only access to the assistance needed to create the hairstyles but a lack of strenuous physical labor that would make them impractical.

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