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In the first book, it's mentioned several times that Harry's hair grows quickly. I don't remember he exact quote, but I remember something like 'he must have gotten more haircuts than all the other boys in his class combined,' and Uncle Vernon mentioning that he needs a haircut every couple weeks.

Where does he get it cut at Hogwarts? For that matter, where do any of the student at Hogwarts get their haircuts?

Here's the quote from The Deathly Hallows that shows that Harry's hair grows long when it's not cut:

His face was huge, shiny, and pink, every feature distorted by Hermione's jinx. His black hair reached his shoulders and there was a dark shadow around his jaw.
-Harry Potter and The Deathly Hallows, chapter 23: Malfoy Manor

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    Are there magical barbers? – RottenCantaloupe Jul 3 '15 at 16:43
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    Are you sure about your first sentence? I only remember one time it grew fast, which was when Petunia cut it dead short (and it grew overnight, by magic). I may be forgetting other references, of course. – Mac Cooper Jul 3 '15 at 16:50
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    Speculation: On his head. – Wad Cheber Jul 3 '15 at 22:03
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    Which one? – Micah Jul 5 '15 at 2:03
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    "Harry is not a Metamorphagus; he is just a boy who was "clearly magical from birth." Incidents like him growing his hair back were due to his untrained, uncontrolled magical powers bursting out when he was angry or frightened." – Valorum Nov 13 '15 at 21:05
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TL;DR:

Harry's hair doesn't grow extraordinarily fast; it only regrows magically fast in response to the unwanted haircuts he receives. So there is no need for special barber arrangements at Hogwarts; Harry gets his hair cut the same way as the other students.

Uncle Vernon on Harry's hair

Uncle Vernon entered the kitchen as Harry was turning over the bacon.
"Comb your hair!" he barked, by way of a morning greeting.

About once a week, Uncle Vernon looked over the top of his newspaper and shouted that Harry needed a haircut. Harry must have had more haircuts than the rest of the boys in his class put together, but it made no difference, his hair simply grew that way — all over the place.

Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone, chapter 2, "The Vanishing Glass"

While this could be interpreted to mean that Harry's hair grew exceptionally fast, necessitating a haircut every week, a far more likely interpretation — especially in light of the treatment Harry receives from the Dursleys — is that uncle Vernon simply takes every opportunity to be mean and abusive to Harry, who looks nothing like his beloved son, Dudley.

Harry vs Dudley

In the same chapter, we get descriptions of both Harry and Dudley.

(...) Harry had always been small and skinny for his age. He looked even smaller and skinnier than he really was because all he had to wear were old clothes of Dudley's, and Dudley was about four times bigger than he was. Harry had a thin face, knobbly knees, black hair, and bright green eyes.

Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone, chapter 2, "The Vanishing Glass"

And, as quoted above, "his hair simply grew that way — all over the place."

Contrast this with Dudley, who as sleek and smooth blond hair:

Dudley looked a lot like Uncle Vernon. He had a large, pink face, not much neck, small, watery blue eyes and thick, blond hair that lay smoothly on his thick, fat head. Aunt Petunia often said that Dudley looked like a baby angel — Harry often said that Dudley looked like a pig in a wig.

Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone, chapter 2, "The Vanishing Glass"

So Harry looks nothing like Dudley, and neither does his hair. Yet another reason for uncle Vernon to verbally abuse Harry.

The haircuts — and lack thereof

Once, Aunt Petunia, tired of Harry coming back from the barbers looking as though he hadn't been at all, had taken a pair of kitchen scissors and cut his hair so short he was almost bald except for his bangs, which she left "to hide that horrible scar."
(...)
Next morning, however, he had gotten up to find his hair exactly as it had been before Aunt Petunia had sheared it off.

Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone, chapter 2, "The Vanishing Glass"

If Harry's hair grew this fast all the time, he'd need a haircut every day to not end up with hair down to his knees. But that doesn't happen. That is because Harry's hair doesn't grow extraordinarily fast; it regrows magically fast in response to the unwanted haircuts he receives, either from the barber or from his aunt Petunia.

Note that the book doesn't mention aunt Petunia having to cut his hair to keep it in check; she simply wants to cut it because she doesn't like it the way he wears it.

A couple of lines further on in the chapter we read how a sweater Harry doesn't want to wear magically shrinks. Yet his other clothes do not shrink all the time.

Conclusion

There is no need for special barber arrangements at Hogwarts. Harry can get his hair cut the same way as all students.

Magical haircuts

No mention is made how Hogwarts students — or indeed wizards in general — have their hair cut, but it can be done by magic, as the following quote shows, although it doesn't rule out that it is done mechanically as well.

It provided a distraction, watching Mrs. Weasley force Charlie into a chair, raise her wand threateningly, and announce that he was about to get a proper haircut.

(...)

Charlie approached, running his hand slightly ruefully over his new, brutally short haircut.

Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, chapter 7, "The Will of Albus Dumbledore"

Shaving

Another quote from the same chapter shows that shaving may involve magic as well.

The other packages contained an enchanted razor from Bill and Fleur ("Ah yes, zis will give you ze smoothest shave you will ever 'ave," Monsieur Delacour assured him, "but you must tell it clearly what you want... ozzerwise you might find you 'ave a leetle less hair zan you would like...") (...)

Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, chapter 7, "The Will of Albus Dumbledore"

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There's a discussion thread here about this very issue. The most compelling answer I found is that it's done magically.

Ginny did not seek another one-to-one meeting with Harry for the rest of the day, nor by any look or gesture did she show that they had shared more than polite conversation in her room. Nevertheless, Charlie’s arrival came as a relief to Harry. It provided a distraction, watching Mrs Weasley force Charlie into a chair, raise her wand threateningly and announce that he was about to get a proper haircut. - HPDH

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    Is a theme park really canon? At the parks, both Hogsmeade and Diagon Alley have Ollivander's locations. I'm pretty sure that's not book or even movie accurate. – phantom42 Jul 3 '15 at 18:03
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    if magic became real tomorrow, would anyone working in manual labour keep their job?? – Daft Jul 3 '15 at 18:15
  • @phantom42 I don't know where the picture came from; blame Richard! – Rand al'Thor Jul 3 '15 at 20:40
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    Yes, I know it's from the link. But if you read the source cited in the link, it mentions that the shop's only appearance is at the theme parks. I'm questioning how canon the existence of it in a theme park is, particularly since I can think of at least one major change/difference off the top of my head. – phantom42 Jul 3 '15 at 21:53
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    Wow, all the gods piling in to edit my answer. Now all I need is Slytherincess to have a go. Have fun, guys! :-D – Rand al'Thor Jul 4 '15 at 10:26
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Harry's hair is magically unalterable:

Harry must have had more haircuts than the rest of the boys in his class put together, but it made no difference, his hair simply grew that way
    Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone, chapter 2, "The Boy Who Lived"

Aunt Petunia [...] cut his hair [...]. Next morning, however, he had gotten up to find his hair exactly as it had been before Aunt Petunia had sheared it off.
    Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone, chapter 2, "The Boy Who Lived"

Harry [... had] jet-black hair that was always untidy.
    Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets, chapter 1, "The Worst Birthday"

His jet-black hair, however, was just as it always had been — stubbornly untidy, whatever he did to it.
    Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban, chapter 1, "Owl Post"

He raised his hand automatically and tried to make his hair lie flat “You’re fighting a losing battle there, dear,” said his mirror in a wheezy voice.
    Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban, chapter 4, "The Leaky Cauldron"

Mrs. Weasley was attacking his hair with a wet comb. She pressed hard on the top of his head. “Doesn’t it ever lie flat?” she said desperately. Harry shook his head.
    Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix, chapter 7, "The Ministry of Magic"

Since cutting his hair useless, there is no point in doing so. So he (probably) does never get his hair cut at Hogwarts.

That would be a problem if his hair grew naturally, because it would become extraordinarily long. But that doesn't happen. So we can conclude his hair doesn't grow.

That means that, even if you cut it or let time go by, Harry's hair remains always the same.

  • At least that's how I understood it. – Oriol Jul 5 '15 at 2:59
  • ..But he does cut it. Check the first book. – Mithrandir Jul 5 '15 at 2:59
  • No, at 'home'. No mention of it afterwards, hence the question. – Mithrandir Jul 5 '15 at 3:01
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    Do you mean to say that Harry has magical hair that is never too long or too short (see your quote :P)? – Mithrandir Jul 5 '15 at 3:05
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    @Mithrandir Yes, exactly. Harry's hair is unalterable. – Oriol Jul 5 '15 at 12:46
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My thought is that yes, haircuts happen magically in the wizarding world. And as it is suggested that people get a trim every 6-8 weeks my only thought is that there must be someone at hogwarts to do it. Perhaps madam Pomfrey (being the one to care for students health needs.) would open up shop. Perhaps as well the house elves did it. The question then becomes, if there is a spell for it, how come Harry's hair grew so long in the Deathly Hallows? My only answer here is that Ron possibly never needed to learn the spell (Mrs. Weasley) and Harry probably never got the hang of it (being only mediocre.). Hermione however probably knew the spell but was not confident in her wand work for cutting hair. So if this spell is so tricky and finicky, maybe Hogwarts had a special magical barber/hairdresser come in once a week or once a month to give the students haircuts.

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