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This question already has an answer here:

The part in GoT where Daenerys strikes the deal with Kraznys to exchange one dragon for 8000 unsullied warriors, it was an easily predictable risk that Kraznys was sacrificing his own protection.

Before the deal took place and Daenerys asks for all Unsullied warriors, I guessed that Khaleesi ccould turn the same warriors against their old masters. Also, the dragon was hard to train, since she was their mother, thus they won't hurt her. It was an easily predictable scenario and Kraznys failed to see it.

I mean a person so powerful as Kraznys, he must be intelligent to understand the risks. Also, Ser Jorah shows discomfort when Daenerys strikes the deal.

How didn't great master and warrior, ignore such an easy plot?

marked as duplicate by Möoz, Wad Cheber, Dr R Dizzle, Shevliaskovic, Lightness Races in Orbit Aug 5 '15 at 16:25

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  • I don't see this as a duplicate. The questions are totally different though they deal the same topic. But you can't expect me to go through 500 questions just to find if someone has asked the topic. While typing the question, the mentioned question didn't reflect. – GuruGulabKhatri Aug 5 '15 at 12:34
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    There's nothing wrong with writing questions that turn out to be duplicates with different wording, in fact it can be useful for the site (now the same content can be found if people search for "Kraznys" or "Astapor"). But I do think TLP's answer in the linked question answers this best - the slave cities are complacent because they're used to everyone seeing them as a valuable resource, they've never before encountered someone who was powerful and anti-slavery. They think they're safe because they expect happy customers to come back for more and not 'kill the golden goose' as we'd say. – user568458 Aug 5 '15 at 13:49
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    +1 for "there's nothing wrong with writing questions that turn out to be duplicates." It's a natural reflex to feel offended at flags, but they're not an insult, they're for the sake of the site's structure. – WannabeCoder Aug 5 '15 at 15:58
  • “you can't expect me to go through 500 questions just to find if someone has asked the topic” — no-one expects you to do that. That’s why other people can vote to close as a duplicate. – Paul D. Waite Aug 5 '15 at 16:30
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    “The questions are totally different though they deal the same topic.” Totally different? They both mention how unlikely it was that the dragon would obey Kraznys immediately, and that it seemed unlikely that Kraznys would be that naive, given his status. They’re both asking why Kraznys didn’t think that Daenerys would do what she did. – Paul D. Waite Aug 5 '15 at 16:35
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I see 3 points there with Kraznys:

  1. When she offered a dragon he forgot anything else.
  2. During the presentation of the Unsullied he insults her all the time, thinking she is just a little stupid girl. I think he even calls her whore sometime, thinking she doesn't understand Valyrian
  3. He's a businessman, and his commodity is Unsullied. He probably didn't think anyone would want to wipe him out because that would eliminate the only source of Unsullied troops. He probably never imagined that he'd run into such an idealist. (kudos to Liesmith)

Jorah just couldn't beleive that she would give away one of the dragons, thus his discomfort. And he also thinks she is still just a little girl and has no idea on how the world works.

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    Both good points. Also, he's a businessman, and his commodity is Unsullied. He probably didn't think anyone would want to wipe him out because that would eliminate the only source of Unsullied troops. He probably never imagined that he'd run into such an idealist. – Liesmith Aug 5 '15 at 9:22
  • @Liesmith I hope you don't mind that I added this as a third point to my answer. – Thomas Aug 5 '15 at 9:28
  • Not at all; I didn't think it warranted being a separate answer altogether. – Liesmith Aug 5 '15 at 12:21
  • I think the final sentence of Liesmith's comment is a really important part of it too so perhaps add that as well? :) – Lightness Races in Orbit Aug 5 '15 at 16:26
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I seem to remember in the books that Kraznys' oversight was viewing the dragon in the same light as the unsullied i.e. it would understand the change in ownership and only obey its new master. From this view point, Kraznys clearly felt it was a fair trade, and he'd now have a dragon to protect him

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