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Normally Star Trek seems to based on some sort of logic, but the time travel in "Star Trek: Enterprise" seems to have no logic at all, or am I just missing it?

Example: If they go back in time to change something it takes time until it has any effect in the future? I can't see any reason for this.

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    Let's just face it. Time Travel is illogical, period. – PearsonArtPhoto Jan 27 '12 at 13:09
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    What was it T'Pol used to say? The Vulcan Science Ministry has decided that time travel is impossible, or something like that. – Xantec Jan 27 '12 at 13:30
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    It is important to remember Star Trek's motto: "We Hate Continuity." atwitsendcomics.com/comics/index/23/Old-Kirk – Jack B Nimble Jan 27 '12 at 15:17
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    Time travel was always way too easy in Star Trek. – Philip from Australia Jan 27 '12 at 22:30
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    Is there a question here aside from "let's talk"? – neilfein Feb 14 '12 at 20:36
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In ST:Enterprise, time travel happened many times successfully despite the fact that the Vulcans said concept of time travel illogical..
Once Archer was taken to the 31st century in the future, which created a new timeline in which everything was destroyed including time machine.. At that time, the original timeline was intact containing the time traveling event too.
Every time-based manipulation creates a new timeline for reality to flow... it's common in many sci-fi canons.

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    Especially since they never settle on a constant effect of time travel. In some cases it creates and alternate timeline that continues to exist, in some it destroys the timeline, in others it leaves the experience of the timeline intact, but the actual facts change, and don't even start on Chakotay the time pruner. Time travel in ST fits that story's plot and cannot be taken to have any relevance to any other story. – Tyson of the Northwest Feb 15 '12 at 20:46
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    @TysonoftheNorthwest Multiverse theory in the real world means that any theoretical outcome is not only possible but does occur. So, if you time traveled in the real world, you would have every single possible outcome occur: in one universe, it would be destroyed, in another it would change everything, in another people could remember events from other timelines. So, the writers just choose to continue in one of the universes. Multiverse theory is fun. – Aaron Harun Jun 27 '17 at 8:17

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