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Does anyone know a SF TV short story in which there were blue men who helped "stage" our world- at least the parts we saw, on a minute by minute basis.

So, at each minute, everyone would be in the "world" that was built for that minute, then they would go on to the next "minute world". The blue men were in the future minutes building most of reality, but only the parts that would be looked at at that minute (to save work, I think - why build something that will not every be "used")

And they were in the past tearing down all the previously lived minutes.

It was kind of a behind the scenes look at why when you set your keys down and come back to them, they aren't there. Then you look again a few minutes later and they are there. The reason in the show was that the blue men building that minute forgot to include your keys, but the next group got it right.

Years later, my wife and I still refer back to that show, so I would like to find out what it was and see if I can find a copy somewhere.

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marked as duplicate by SQB, Jenayah, TheLethalCarrot, Rand al'Thor Jan 11 at 9:12

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That's Theodore Sturgeon's short story "Yesterday was Monday", which inspired the New Twilight Zone episode "A Matter of Minutes".

  • Wow! You found it! And Fast! Thanks. – saunderl Jan 27 '12 at 20:11
  • I've been looking high and low for this episode as well--always referenced it when things went missing and very few got the reference. THANKS SO MUCH for finally helping me locate it! Now I can show it to friends to help "explain". – user20884 Dec 30 '13 at 7:00
  • Please could you add some more detail to this answer, e.g. by quoting from the links you provide, so that it's clearer how the story/stories you mention fit the one described in the question? – Rand al'Thor Apr 18 '16 at 0:23
  • @Randal'Thor: I'm not convinced that's necessary. The question already has a good description of the story. – Keith Thompson Apr 18 '16 at 17:46
  • @KeithThompson But without a description in the answer, it's not obvious how well what you've found matches what the OP was looking for! Not strictly necessary, true (given that you've already got an acceptance and a lot of upvotes), but it would set a good example for new story-ID answerers :-) (See also recent meta discussion about writing story-ID answers.) – Rand al'Thor Apr 18 '16 at 17:53

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