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For questions about The Silmarillion, a collection of works by J.R.R. Tolkien posthumously published by his son, Christopher in 1977. Always use in conjunction with the [tolkiens-legendarium] tag.

5
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As you say, the Moriquendi just refers to all those Elves who never went to Aman. That's a pretty large and diverse group, and it's hard to make sweeping statements about the whole, but we can subdivi …
answered Jan 18 '16 by Jason Baker
27
votes
1answer
In The Silmarillion, we're told that Gil-galad is the son of Fingon, son of Fingolfin: Great was the lamentation in Hithlum when the fall of Fingolfin became known, and Fingon in sorrow took the l …
asked Oct 31 '16 by Jason Baker
5
votes
There are really two reasons Melkor really wanted his own creation This is Melkor's defining character trait, and motivates every decision he makes in the entire Silmarillion; he wants to be the Eru …
answered Jan 6 '16 by Jason Baker
7
votes
As ATB remarks in a comment on the question, the Valar didn't want to sink Beleriand. It just so happened that Morgoth was so powerful, the destruction of Beleriand was an unavoidable consequence of d …
answered Jul 20 '16 by Jason Baker
3
votes
Well I wouldn't use the word "prisoners", but it's very probable that Morgoth took some Elves alive as slaves. Slaves The taking of slaves isn't unusual for Morgoth; he does it quite frequently: …
answered Sep 19 '15 by Jason Baker
3
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There were likely some casualties, but at least some of the inhabitants made their way to Moria (emphasis mine): After the end of the First Age the power and wealth of Khazad-dûm was much increase …
answered May 11 '16 by Jason Baker
13
votes
This is answered explicitly in the text (emphasis mine): Thingol looked in silence upon Lúthien; and he thought in his heart: 'Unhappy Men, children of little lords and brief kings, shall such as …
answered Oct 19 '15 by Jason Baker
6
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Sauron It's not entirely clear. It does seem that, at least initially, the Haradrim and Easterlings were directly under Sauron's control, but did have their own forms of government (emphasis mine): …
answered Nov 16 '15 by Jason Baker
3
votes
Their first home was the Timeless Halls, out in the Void, where Eru dwells. That's where they were created, and where they lived before the Music of the Ainur. But I don't think that's what the questi …
answered Jan 3 '16 by Jason Baker
10
votes
Unknown. However, note that the light from the Two Trees (or a portion of that light, at least) appears more substantial than light as we think of it (emphasis mine): The one [Tree] had leaves of …
answered Nov 16 '15 by Jason Baker
40
votes
The short version is that Tolkien changed his mind on the subject repeatedly; at various points in the progression, Gil-galad has been descended from: Fëanor Finrod Fingon Orodreth, Finarfin's grand …
answered Oct 31 '16 by Jason Baker
5
votes
I'm not entirely confident Tuor ever got to the Undying Lands; the text is pretty cagey on the subject. The quote from the published Silmarillion is as follows (emphasis mine): In those days Tuor …
answered Oct 24 '15 by Jason Baker
19
votes
Because Aulë tried to create rational life. In Tolkien's (I will remind you, intensely Catholic) morality, attempting to usurp Ilúvatar's authority, or bypass his Plan, is a Bad Thing. The published …
answered Nov 24 '15 by Jason Baker
9
votes
Does Noldolantë exist? Not exactly. Christopher Tolkien remarks on this on The Shaping of Middle-earth, in relation to an earlier draft of the Quenta Silmarillion: The reference to 'song of the F …
answered Jun 16 '15 by Jason Baker
4
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No official version, and as far as I know Tolkien never felt compelled to attempt one. In honesty it doesn't make a lot of sense to take the Ainulindalë literally as a text; considering we're talking …
answered Aug 6 '15 by Jason Baker

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