230

You can remove these scenes or shrink them and still get the same movie No, you can't. The pacing and mood of the movie depend on scenes having the right pace and structure. These scene contribute exactly what they're supposed to: they help maintain and set a mood. They frame the characters behavior and personae. They establish the norm for the scenarios ...


116

The job of the director is to make the viewer truly feel the characters' situation. I believe he did that, and quite masterfully too. The truth is - space exploration is slow, brain meltingly slow ...there's really not much to do for most of the time. After a while, there's nothing to talk about other than petty operational concerns. The crew just drudge ...


71

In the book 2001: A Space Odyssey it was made explicitly clear that the monoliths were the emissary(s) of a benevolent alien species whose main aim was the advancement of less evolved species; Night after night, the spectacle of those four plump man-apes was repeated, until it had become a source of fascinated exasperation, serving to increase Moon-...


66

Actually it was Arthur C. Clarke who knew of the work and was inspired by it Who can forget HAL being reduced to drivel while singing composer Harry Dacre’s 1892 classic standard “Daisy Bell (Bicycle Built for Two)”? Clarke got the idea for the scene from a 1962 visit to Bell Labs; where, as Benson explains, he’d heard voice-synthesizer experiments with an ...


62

In the film 2001: A Space Odyssey, the nature of the black monoliths is deliberately left unclear. The director, Stanley Kubrick, stated in a 1968 interview with Playboy that: You're free to speculate as you wish about the philosophical and allegorical meaning of the film—and such speculation is one indication that it has succeeded in gripping the ...


60

The best reason is not in-universe, but viewer-verse: The sound that a record or tape makes when played too slow, by broken equipment, was familiar and had an immediate connotation of "malfunction" to the audience at the time the movie was made. Those audiences did not have exposure to the sound that clipping or buffering issues would cause, which is what ...


57

This is discussed (at length) in the accompanying book. In short, the second monolith was an alarm device intended to show that the apes on the planet below had evolved to the point that they were able to reach their nearest planetary neighbour and to perform basic survey tasks. That being the case, it would now be of benefit for the monolith-builders to ...


54

A reduction in audio clock speed could cause slow playback like HAL's. It's not a great reason—gowenfar's answer regarding connotations of "malfunction" makes much more sense—but it would cause the same symptoms in audio playback in real systems old and new. Sound is a series of air pressure waves; analog audio devices (including gramophones, vinyl records, ...


50

There is at least one reference to Pan-Am the American airline. The Orion III Spaceplane is a sub-orbital spacecraft owned by Pan American World Airways and used in transit from Earth to Space Station V. It was about the size of a Boeing 737, and could seat approximately 32 passengers and at least 3 crew members, consisting of a flight attendant, and two ...


49

The scenes that you have mentioned in 2001 represent common motifs that can be found in all of Kubrick's movies. Yes, the story of 2001 can be told without them, but at the cost of meaning that can be found throughout his movies, as well as a his artistic vision. A flight attendant walks down an aisle to retrieve a floating pen. Frank Poole is ...


44

Just watching 2001: A Space Odyssey, one must conclude that HAL was incorrect. By killing off the crew, HAL was making the mission unlikely to succeed. The crew were there to carry out the mission... killing them is detrimental to the mission. HAL killed the crew to prevent them from shutting down HAL for repairs. The crew would have kept HAL running, ...


44

Their Russian sounds rusty, but it is more or less possible to understand what they say. Before they meet Floyd: Dr. Stretyneva: Ну куда он сейчас уедем? (Grammar mistake: mixing 3rd person singular pronoun with a 1st person plural verb) Dr. Smyslov: Эээ, приблизительно в два часа. Dr. Kalinin: Может быть, пойдем в обсерваторию? Elena: Как только <он ...


37

Kubrick was a master of detail, especially 'throwaway detail', subtle elements that are difficult to implement and only seen briefly. The jogging scene, for example, required a rotating set to be built, yet it was only fully used once in the film. The scene in the space station with the Russians required a curved set to be built, considerably more expensive ...


30

A key reason* is that Kubrick was not displacing anyone else from appearing in the opening credits. Lucas's name appeared in the opening of Star Wars, in the form of a production studio credit. Since Lucas was also directing, there was no director whose name was missing, and with Lucas implicitly indicated as the creative force behind the production of the ...


27

The original screenplay describes his mental decline in a little more detail. The slowing and deepening of his voice was intended to demonstrate his becoming "childish" and eventually stopping when his higher logic functions had been removed: BOWMAN IGNORES HIM. HAL : Dave, I don't understand why you're doing this to me.... I have the greatest ...


24

When they enter the pod for the first time, Dave tests to see if HAL can hear him by issuing a simple, non-suspicious command such as rotating the pod. When he shuts down the communications, Dave tests things again using that same command. That way, he is sure that HAL cannot not hear them. This might seem foolish because HAL could fake that he cannot hear ...


23

Rotation around the roll axis of a long thin object isn't stable; a mathematical explanation of why can be found in this Physics StackExchange question. Even if Discovery was initially tumbling on its roll axis the instability would cause conversion to end-over-end rotation over time.


23

As you can see, the Discovery isn't using its main engines at the point that Bowman exits the ship That being the case, the two objects in question; Bowman and the Discovery are traveling at the same relative velocity, presumably tens of thousands of miles per hour. To put it another way, when Bowman leaves he uses the pod's thruster to increase his speed ...


22

I have seen gradual slowing of external interactions in real computers with increasingly overloaded memory. HAL is suffering from reduced memory size. It has to dedicate more and more of its processor capacity to managing memory. It has to compress and decompress, move live data to high latency storage, rearrange blocks, and recalculate rather than reusing ...


21

The Discovery One (the space ship bound to Jupiter) has a centrifuge that provides artificial gravity through rotation in a small section of the ship.


19

The second monolith was a beacon that signaled the civilization that created it that humanity had reached the Moon. The first monolith kickstarted humanity's evolution from simple primates, while the second one was monitoring when they became a space faring race which marked them ready for the next part of the grand plan.


18

I can't find a conclusive answer, but here's what I did find: The script is no help - it doesn't even mention the conversation between the Russians before Floyd approaches them, and all it says about their conversation after he leaves is: THE RUSSIANS EXCHANGE A FEW SERIOUS PARAGRAPHS IN RUSSIAN From the comments on the YouTube video itself: ...


17

In the accompanying novel we see that HAL was neither lying, nor mistaken. He was, in fact suffering from a condition that would be characterised in humans as a form of self-destructive psychosis. His program was sophisticated enough to manufacture an imagined fault that he could then attempt to fix, thus allowing him to disconnect the radio link to Earth. ...


16

No. The objects inside the spinning wheel will experience an artificial gravity effect which appears to be pushing outwards from the center of the wheel. Since all the objects inside the station (including your bristles) already have a considerable amount of motion relative to a stationary observer outside, they will simply travel to the outside wall (e.g. ...


16

The passage in question in my 1968 first printing of the novel reads: The monolith was 11 feet high, and 1¼ by 5 feet in cross-section. When its dimensions were checked with great care, they were found to be in the exact ratio 1 to 4 to 9—the squares of the first three integers. Note that the depth of the monolith is one and one-quarter, not eleven ...


15

2001: A Space Odyssey was written concurrently with the development of the film. This is covered in the Development section of the Wikipedia article, for example: Early drafts included a short prologue containing interviews with scientists about extraterrestrial life, voice-over narration (a feature in all of Kubrick's previous films), a stronger emphasis ...


15

The scenes you refer to are deliberately slow and feature mundane activities. To quote from the sf-encyclopedia.com entry on the film "The idea of human deficiency in the twenty-first century is reinforced by the deliberate banality of the dialogue and the sterility of the settings; ironically the most "human" character is a neurotic computer" The ...


14

in 2010, Chandra explained that "The situation was in conflict with the basic purpose of HAL's design: The accurate processing of information without distortion or concealment. He became trapped. The technical term is an H. Moebius loop, which can happen in advanced computers with autonomous goal-seeking programs." Chandra goes on to explain ...


14

Low Earth orbit is the most efficient place to locate a transfer station. The energy required to reach low Earth orbit is the most efficient place to locate a transfer station. The greatest difficulty in launching spacecraft is getting them into stable orbits around the Earth. The reason for this is that the energy required to reach the initial low Earth ...


13

At least some of the props did survive, and they can be seen in a Stanley Kubrick exhibition that's been touring the world for 13 years. According to its web site, the exhibition is currently in Mexico City (until May 29, 2017). The next stop will be Copenhagen (September 23, 2017 to January 14, 2018). The web site has a lot of photos, which show several ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible