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188

Here’s an incomplete list of the biggest things I can remember that were omitted or simplified significantly in the movies versus the books. The whole post is riddled with spoilers so I won’t even try masking them; you have been warned: Overall: Probably the largest single overt omission from the entire movie series was the character of Peeves the ...


98

No George R. R. Martin has written on his Not A Blog about this subject where he states that though the Iron Throne is iconic and he does like the way it is shown in the show it's not what he had in mind. However, he does state that there are good reasons why the show couldn't use the version he had in mind. And yet, and yet... it's still not right. It's ...


94

What you're seeing here is Peter Jackson adapting the films to try to make the plot more interesting, detracting from the books. This is common occurrence in the films as Peter wanted to change the tone of certain scenes to build the tensions quicker than those in Tolkien's The Lord of the Rings The phrase itself is not meant as an offence to the ...


71

First, major differences: Moral/philosophical/ethical/political/social underpinnings. The novel was an ode to the citizen soldier, with in-depth asides for explaining the ethical and political system of humanity. Christopher Weuve's excellent "Thoughts on Starship Troopers" resource addresses this in great detail with supporting cites, see especially "...


69

There are some very interesting articles about this (and similar matters) here, here and here. Also, an interesting discussion back from 2006 in this forum. Generally speaking, it seems that Peter Jackson doesn't really like that part of the book, and it also seems that Tolkien himself intended the chapter to represent a local situation in England, which ...


65

There's quite a bit, but let me sum up... The framing story In the movie, the story is being read by a grandfather to his sick grandson, and that's all there is to it. In the novel, the setup is close but not quite. The author states (lies) that the novel is an abridgement of a much larger satirical renaissance work subtitled "S. Morgenstern's Classic ...


63

Bilbo Baggins is (or at least was) a respected member of the Hobbiton community. He knows that by going on an adventure he has already lost some degree of respect in his community and probably does not want to lose any more by revealing he was a professional burglar. Ideally no-one would ever find out but he has no choice but to tell the auctioneer in ...


59

There is no auctioneer in the book. Bilbo arrives halfway during the auction. He's not asked for a legal document, but "the legal bother lasted for years" and "it was a long time before he was admitted to be alive again". (...) He had arrived back in the middle of an auction! There was a large notice in black and red hung on the gate, stating that on June ...


57

This is a surprisingly interesting question. How much could have been in the movies? Gandalf's origin is hinted at in the Appendices: When maybe a thousand years had passed, and the first shadow had fallen on Greenwood the Great, the Istari or Wizards appeared in Middle-Earth. It was afterwards said that they came out of the Far West and were messengers ...


53

The answer to this is Francis Ford Coppola's Dracula. Yes, it exaggerates a relationship between Dracula and Mina and makes up a story for how Dracula became a vampire (which the novel never explains and hints that Dracula, himself, doesn't know how it happened). It also is a bit eccentric with the costumes and leaves out the full bat transformation but ...


52

Yes, at least twice. Both come from Philosopher’s Stone, which was released a year after the book version of Goblet of Fire: In the film, after escaping from Fluffy for the first time, Ron and Harry accompany Hermione up the stairs to her dormitory (1h3m). When they try to pull the same stunt in the book Order of the Phoenix, they discover the stairs are ...


52

Time, pacing, and narrative focus Quoting from a 2000-ish interview with Ain't it Cool News1: "Also, will you be including Tom Bombadil? The Ralph Bakshi production cut it out, as did the BBC radio drama.” PJ: At this point in time Bombadil is out. The main reason is not just time or pace, but one of simple narrative focus ... the Bombadil sequence ...


50

No, it wasn't in the books (based on text searches I did on ebooks for Malfoy, cane, Lucius) Moreover, it is explicitly confirmed by the actor who played Malfoy (Jason Isaacs) that he was the one who came up with the concept and the design “I complained after [film] four or five that I didn’t have my own wand. I invented and designed my cane, that had a ...


49

There are several reasons. Running Time - adding in the explanations of the psychic squid and Vaught's teleportation machine would have made the movie run much longer. It was already at the maximum running length most people would sit through. Characters - The island and its inhabitants were able to be entirely cut from the movie by eliminating the psychic ...


49

Indeed, this goes all the way back to 1962 and the the first-ever Spider-man story, Amazing Fantasy 15. From comicbookresources.com: Peter decides to test out his newfound powers by taking part in an amateur wrestling competition, donning a mask just in case he loses. Peter quickly beats pro wrestler Crusher Hogan and wins the competition prize money. A ...


48

Aragorn did more than touch the stone in the book - he wrests it to his own mastery, and sees things in it which are crucial for the plot. But as with so many things, it didn't happen as shown in the movie. When they return to Helm's Deep after the events at Isengard, Aragorn appears looking grey and has this conversation with Legolas and Gimli: 'I have ...


46

I’m not sure this is quite cut and dried as you’d hope, but the first thing that comes to mind is Lavender Brown’s skin colour. (In)famously, by now, Lavender Brown was a minor character in the first movies, with no lines. She was portrayed by two black actresses: Kathleen Cauley (unverified) in Chamber of Secrets and Jennifer Smith in Prisoner of Azkaban. ...


46

Éomer isn't offended by being called horse-master in the book. The conversation goes slightly differently. Aragorn hails the Riders, and introduces himself as Strider. Éomer responds suspiciously, and asks if they are Elves; to which Aragorn replies: 'One only of us is an Elf, Legolas from the Woodland Realm in distant Mirkwood. But we have passed ...


43

The trailer starts with "My dear Frodo, you once asked me whether I had told you everything about my adventures", and you see young Frodo and old Bilbo. Thus, it seems that the story of the Hobbit is part of Bilbo's narration, or it may even be Frodo reading "There and back again", who remembers his young days (as seen in the trailer), before delving into ...


40

For this, we need to go back a lot - ages back - and examine Arwen's parentage, and the Lay of Leithian, the story of Beren and Lúthien. This is a rather long story (the longest in the Silmarillion, I believe, or perhaps the second longest after the Narn i Chîn Húrin, the story of the Children of Hurin), and while I strongly urge you to go read the ...


38

It appears as though George R. R. Martin discussed this in an interview with Entertainment Weekly back in 2011 before Season 1 was first aired. This will be a big area of debate among your obsessive fans on the Web: What changes have you noticed the producers have made in your material? There are changes, but I’m not sure how many of them are important. ...


37

As far as I can tell, there is no mention in the book of Lucius Malfoy using a walking stick at all, much less storing his wand in it. For example, when he is first introduced in Chamber of Secrets (chapter At Flourish and Blotts): The man who followed could only be his [Draco’s] father. He had the same pale, pointed face and identical cold grey eyes. Mr ...


35

From Gollum - LOTR Wiki In a manuscript written to guide illustrators to the appearance of his characters, Tolkien explained this by saying that Gollum had pale skin, but wore dark clothes and was often seen in poor light. The Hobbit states he has pockets, in which he keeps a tooth sharpening rock, goblin teeth, wet shells, and a scrap of bat wing. Despite ...


35

No. There is even a joke made by Littlefinger where he counts the swords and says there aren't even two hundred swords when according to the book there are over a thousand. Varys: A thousand blades. Taken from the hands of Aegon's fallen enemies. Forged in the fire of Balerion the Dread. Littlefinger: There aren't a ...


34

No explanation that I can find. Even after expanding it to two movies, there are tons of stuff that they have left out. They had to. Otherwide we'd have 5 parts of HP5, 6 of HP6 (God forbid), and 7 of HP7 (by which time Radcliffe would look more like Dumbledore--alright, doing the math; more like Lupin). As Kyralessa mentioned, JKR didn't write the movie. ...


34

I can think of a few main reasons, though I also am not aware if Jackson ever said so: To make sure everyone sees Frodo (and by proxy, Sam) as the hero(s) of the film. This simplifies it for a film audience, and focuses the story more on the destruction of the Ring. To enhance the love story, and to give Arwen more import to the story. He thankfully thought ...


34

Things changed: Newt is no longer said to have graduated Hogwarts. 2001 Upon graduation from Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry, Mr. Scamander joined the Ministry of Magic in the Department for the regulation and Control of Magical Creatures. 2017 Upon leaving Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry, Mr. Scamander joined the Ministry of ...


33

Because the helmet prop was not made properly (IMO) and kept on falling over and breaking. From an interview with IGN; transcribed by Comic Book Therapy: Secretly I think I was the biggest advocate for not having the helmet. Secretly between me and whoever is watching [laughs]. It’s just incredibly uncomfortable. The amount of times it would fall off and ...


32

Short answer: It was a decision by the american publisher. The European edition always had the final chapter. From Wikipedia: The book has three parts, each with seven chapters. Burgess has stated that the total of 21 chapters was an intentional nod to the age of 21 being recognised as a milestone in human maturation. The 21st chapter was omitted ...


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