New answers tagged

4

In Chapter Five of Chamber of Secrets Dumbledore scolds Harry and Ron (albeit without raising his voice) for flying the car to Hogwarts: "Not today, Mr. Weasley," said Dumbledore. "But I must impress upon both of you the seriousness of what you have done. I will be writing to both your families tonight. I must also warn you that if you do anything like ...


10

Yes. But, at least in the later years, Professor Dumbledore humiliates Harry by delivering choice words in a calm manner. This is more effective than if he shouted insults at him like Professor Snape did in his worst moments. The best example is in Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince chapter 20. Dumbledore heaved a deep sigh, then said, ‘But never ...


3

Well, I don't know if this meets your definition of "scolded," but here are some instances (really just the one scene) from Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince Chapter 23 Horcruxes: (emphases mine) “Harry, Harry, only because Voldemort made a grave error, and acted on Professor Trelawney’s words! If Voldemort had never murdered your father, would he ...


2

For much the same reason that they take it upon themselves to first look for Hermione, second lock the troll in the girls' toilets (though they don't know it's the girls' toilets yet) and finally to rescue Hermione themselves (although in this case there is another, probably stronger, reason: supreme urgency, and also a desire to rectify their mistake). For ...


2

Because Dumbledore was not at Hogwarts, and it would have been too late When the trio rushes to find Dumbledore, they meet professor McGonagall, and she tells them the news. Harry Potter and The Sorcerer's Stone, Chapter 16 “Professor Dumbledore left ten minutes ago,” she said coldly. “He received an urgent owl from the Ministry of Magic and flew ...


Top 50 recent answers are included