64

In the appendix to the novel, it's made clear that people carry their gods with them and that when they alight in a new place, those gods are made anew in the image of the old god. There's an Odin in Norway and an Odin (Wednesday) in America at the same time but they're not the same being. The old man nodded slowly. He said, “My people went from here to ...


30

When the gods came to America, they did not leave their original lands. Depending how you look at it, the gods either sent a version of themselves abroad, or they left versions of themselves behind. Originally the two versions were (almost) the same, they may even have remained the same for a while, but over time they diverged. It was more than a hundred ...


24

He said in an interview: The farm with an ash tree, an hour south of Blackburg (“American Gods”), is, in fact, an old crumbling farm of Tori Amos’ family. Gaiman, a good friend of Amos, visited the farm while on tour with her years ago and decided to use it in his book. He wasn’t sure he’d ever told anyone that before. Ten Things To Know: Neil Gaiman ...


23

VERY literally: 'What-is-it from-which this shit has befallen to me? Is it not a sufficiency I have suffered/endured? It's a sufficiency besides. I'm not evil! I'm not!'


16

I don't have the book here, but remember at the end : Which seems to implies that there's in fact one "different" God in every country visited by a worshiper of that God. American Gods are just a different form of Gods existing all over the globe. For example, the American Kali won't be very powerful, but her indian iteration (where there's a lot of people ...


15

This site sources fluent Gaelic speakers as translating the speech more-or-less as: "“Haven’t I believed enough in your bullshit? Haven’t I suffered enough? Isn’t that enough itself? I’m not evil! I’m not!” (or, in the original tongue) ""Créd as co tarlaid an cac-sa-dam? Nach lór rofhulangas? Is lór chena, níam olc! Níam!"


14

Going off of the author's in-universe justification for not including Jesus in the main story, namely that Jesus wouldn't fall for Wednesday's con, it only makes sense that the Devil is similarly uninterested in participating. He has things to do and people to tempt and isn't in any danger of being forgotten. Jesus, at least, has some motivation to appear ...


14

The vigil was supposed to result in Shadow's death, dedicated to Odin/Wednesday. This is mentioned briefly in the all-too-brief conversation between Shadow, Wednesday, and Mr World in which the real plot of the war emerges. Firstly, just as Shadow enters the cave: A voice from behind him, in the shadows, said, very quietly, “You have never disappointed me.” ...


13

The most that can be said is that it wasn't mere leprechaun gold. The story of a leprechaun with a pot of gold needs no explanation, and this appears to be the basis for the infinite Hoard of coins that Sweeney can pull from anywhere, but the story of a leprechaun with a single special coin... isn't really found easily. Actually, Sweeney says it himself: ...


9

They're the Norns. I just read these chapters yesterday, and the text of the book makes it quite clear. Firstly, they're definitely not the Zorya sisters: There were three women standing by the tree. At first glance Shadow thought that they were the Zorya, but he realised in moments that he was mistaken. But they are sisters: They looked like a set of ...


9

No, the women at the world tree are not the Zorya sisters. The world tree is drawn from Norse mythology, so the closest match to the figures shown from Norse mythology would be the Norns. Here is an excerpt from Wikipedia: In Snorri Sturluson's interpretation of the Völuspá, Urðr (Wyrd), Verðandi and Skuld, the three most important of the Norns, come ...


9

Honestly, the wiki article on Hinzelmann's myth is accurate to what is shown in the novel. There's this part from the book about his true form... Where Hinzelmann had been standing stood a male child, no more than five years old. His hair was dark brown, and long. He was perfectly naked, save for a worn leather band around his neck. He was pierced with ...


9

I'm a bit late to this party but let me give this a whirl. When I first read American Gods - some years ago now - I was under the impression that the Forgotten God was Pluto/Hades, god of the underworld.Why do I think this? Well - and please do feel free to correct me - I seem to recall that this god seemed to be wealthy. This fits with the name Pluto - ...


9

Media, among others, just refers to him as the "technical boy". She spread her hands and rolled her eyes comically, funny Lucy Ricardo washing her hands of a disaster. "The technical boy? You met the technical boy? Look he's a good kid. He's one of us. He's just not good wiith people he doesn't know. When you're working for us, you'll see ...


8

Based on a quick comparison the vast majority of the changes appear to be cosmetic, adding internal dialogue, clarifying the personality and feelings of various characters. The longest additions are barely more than a paragraph in length and seem to have little bearing on the overall plotline. For example, in the first chapter we have the addition of “...


8

I can see few reasons: 1. To avoid attention Please notice that Wednesday is a con man - he has been doing various cons since (at very least) beginning of the XX century: in the book he describes various ways he managed to trick people out of their hard-earned money. If he would start living in expensive hotels full of security, he would attract attention ...


7

It was part of a pattern of murders of minor old gods by the new gods. The beginning of the interlude indicates that a "cold war" was in progress by then, with a few seemingly unrelated and accidental deaths. "seemingly" is the key word here. There are too many deaths described to be coincidence. What it sounds like is the new gods moving against the old ...


7

He was feeling lonely. I think Technical Boy was harming himself. From a passage after the one you quoted (emphasis mine): “Just wanted to talk,” said the fat kid. There was a whine in his voice. “It’s creepy in my room. That’s all. It’s creepy in there. Fifty miles to a McDonald’s, can you believe that? Maybe I could stay in here with you.” “What about ...


7

While it wasn't made as a movie, and the HBO/Playtone series fell through, it is a television series on the Starz network, and produced by Freemantle. The showrunners for the first season were Bryan Fuller (Hannibal, Pushing Daisies, Wonderfalls) and Michael Green (Kings). Neil Gaiman is an executive producer. The first season premiered on April 30, 2017, ...


7

There's a few mentions of the Gods coming over with the settlers and immigrants from various 'Old World' countries, the clear implication being that they're pale "incarnations" of the original deities. Wednesday speaks to their origins; When the people came to America they brought us with them. They brought me, and Loki and Thor, Anansi and the Lion-...


7

Spoilers here too--When Sweeney accidentally gives the golden coin to Shadow, it likely was a mistake encouraged by Wednesday, as we later saw that Wednesday used the appearance of error often in his con jobs. Hiring Sweeney may have been only a pretext on Wednesday's part, to gain Shadow some protection at no cost to himself. Of course, Shadow was set on ...


7

This is more or less "explained" in chapter 19, where Shadow talks to Whiskey Jack (quotes from the author's preferred text, emphasis mine): “It’s not going to be a war.” “Then what is it?” Whiskey Jack crushed the beer can between his hands, pressing it until it was flat. “Look,” he said, and pointed to the waterfall. The sun was high enough that ...


6

I believe the culmination of the novel explains fairly well the purpose of Shadow's coins. The gold coin is from the "treasure of the sun", which can only be accessed by American royalty. That Shadow can do the trick is a partial indication of who he really is, and his ancestry. Thus, doing the trick again might reveal who he really is, particularly since ...


5

The place is on Route 607 in a town called Patterson, in Wythe County, Virginia. That's where the Amos family farm is located. I remember Eddie Amos and his brother Woodrow playing cards on the store porch when I was a kid. Back then I didn't have a clue that Ellen Amos would become a superstar.


5

He appears to have self-harmed. After a few moments the noise began. It took him a few moments to figure out what it had to be, then he unlocked his door and walked out into the hallway. It was the fat kid, now back in his own room. It sounded like he was throwing something huge against the walls of the room. From the sounds, Shadow guessed that ...


5

There's nothing in the book to explain it. Hinzelmann tipped his head on one side. He scratched his nose, thoughtfully, rocked back and forth as if he were thinking. “Well,” he said. “That’s a good question. I guess it’s because I owed a certain party a debt. And I’m good for my debts.” “Wednesday?” “That’s the fellow.” And that's all that's said ...


5

No, they're not. Mr. World mentions that he could not actually see Mr. Wednesday for the longest time. Mr. Wednesday for his part did not seem to realize exactly how screwed they were until he sensed Mr. World's arrival. For another angle... all of the "Coming to America" segments, which Mr. Nancy's shiphold speech falls under, are actually a collection ...


5

While this article doesn't explicitly say why she is superpowered, it is explained in an interview with the co creator (Michael Green) as to why her role is so expanded in the series versus the book: It was one of the earliest conversations Bryan and I had, sitting down to talk about our goals for a series adaptation: who gets expanded? And the first name ...


5

Spoilers and quotes and references, oh my... In-universe, the most likely reason is that in his madness Horus saw the pattern ("hidden indians"*) that Shadow also saw in the end. It is not a matter of Horus having more information, but simply of him having the insight given madmen. (Arguably the insight given madmen is merely the gift of ignoring the ...


4

There was a positive intention (by showrunner Bryan Fuller and writer Michael Green) to have "female voices" be more prominent in the show than in the book. More of the female voice? You have to. Because the book is a sausage party. We wanted to have not only Laura represented but to tell Bilquis’ story as well. We have a wonderful episode with ...


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