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132

This question was directly addressed in the episode Birthright, Part 1: BASHIR Data... may I ask you a personal question? DATA Certainly. BASHIR Does your hair grow? Data thinks a moment, taken aback by the question. DATA I can control the rate of my ...


76

Offhand I can think of at least two examples, both of which killed their creators The Pralor (shown) and Cravic Automated Personnel Units from VOY: Prototype. 3947: When it was anticipated that the war would end, the Builders no longer required our services and they intended to terminate us. In doing so, they became the enemy. We are programmed to ...


58

Data did grow a beard at one point (TNG: "The Schizoid Man") so I guess he needs to cut his hair. Alternatively, he can chose when to grow the hair or the beard. After some search I found that in episode "Birthright, Part I" (at 11:05), he says he can control the rate of his hair growth. So judging from that information, it probably means he may need to ...


51

Data's hair definitely does not require trimming. In the episode "Data's Day", Data visits the barber shop while Geordi is getting his own cut. He tries out the following joke with Geordi: My hair does not require trimming you lunkhead! Even though Data is not the best at jokes, this definitely implies that Data does not need the services of the ship ...


42

1938: "Helen O'Loy", a short story by Lester del Rey, first published in Astounding Science-Fiction, December 1938, available at the Internet Archive. Wikipedia plot summary: Two young men, a mechanic, Dave, and a medical student, Phil, collaborate on modifying a household robot, originally meant only to cook and clean. They are more successful than they ...


39

This sounds like Special Deliverance by Clifford D. Simak The cover does have a cube prominent on the cover, on what could be a circle of sand (although on the computer screen it's not entirely clear that's what it is): An android of some sort is pretty visible on the cover, so that's another point in its favor. The description also seems to match pretty ...


27

This is Grand Jeté (The Great Leap) by Rachel Swirsky. It was published in (amongst others) The Best Science Fiction and Fantasy of the Year, Volume 9. A Jewish father has already lost his wife; and now his daughter is dying of cancer. Distraught, he acquires restricted, experimental technology to create a duplicate of his daughter - a duplicate ...


26

This is Off Armageddon Reef by David Weber, first book of the Safehold series. Humanity pushed its way to the stars - and encountered the Gbaba, a ruthless alien race that nearly wiped us out. Earth and her colonies are now smoldering ruins, and the few survivors have fled to distant, Earth-like Safehold, to try to rebuild. But the Gbaba can ...


24

In the original script, Caleb's plan was to simply take her somewhere that they could purchase a compatible induction charging plate, a technology that has presumably become relatively commonplace in the near-future: CALEB: How long does your battery charge last? AVA: Twenty six hours. CALEB: So we’ll have about a day to get to a cell-phone or ...


22

The Doomsday Machine From Star Trek TOS S02E06 - The Doomsday Machine The Doomsday Machine was a "miles long" planet destroying machine created by an unknown civilization. SPOCK: She [the Constellation] was attacked by what appears to be essentially ... a robot, an automated weapon of immense size and power. Its apparent function is to smash planets to ...


21

The short answer is that while parts of Data's body are relatively easy to fix and/or replicate (something we see on several occasions) his Positronic Brain was not. The only three stable positronic brains created in Federation history were all "Soong-type" androids; Lore, Data, and Juliana Soong. The one time an effort was made to replicate Data's ...


21

Because Data's purpose was to be more than the sum of his programming The Memory Alpha page on Data contains a few useful pieces of information: "I chose to believe that I was a person, that I had the potential to become more than a collection of circuits and sub-processors." – Data, 2369 ("Rightful Heir") and Data asserted that he did not only ...


19

Introduced in The Wonderful Wizard of Oz and back story filled in by The Tin Woodsman of Oz, the Nick Chopper, the Tin Woodsman and his counterpart, Captain Fyter, had immortal (if rust-prone) metal bodies with their original consciousness preserved (their original meat parts, still alive because nothing could die in Oz, were glued together into a misshapen ...


19

Aliens have them, but the Federation seems to have abandoned that technology. Sapient missiles ("Warhead", Voy 5x25) A Delta Quadrant species put antimatter warheads aboard self-aware missiles. As a conscious being intent on fulfilling its destructive mission at the cost of its own existence, each missile was comparable to a real-world suicide bomber. ...


18

The only answer is that whatever method Lore used to send the emotion of anger to Data in the outpost, at the beginning Descent part I, was also able to disable his ethical program. As indicated in Descent part II the only way for Data to negatively act upon such emotions is if that program is disabled. LAFORGE: I think what's happening is that Lore is ...


18

I list this because it strongly hints at the potential of human/android love, even if it never gets there. The movie would be Metropolis (1927). The movie largely turns on a robot that is made to look like a woman. We see these two points Rotwang had been in love with a woman named Hel, who left him to marry Fredersen and later died giving birth to ...


17

I think it's Star Trek: Voyager, episode 73, Season 4, Revulsion From the Wiki link: Shortly after the party ends Voyager receives a distress call, sent by Dejaren - a hologram alone aboard a ship. His six flesh-and-blood crewmates have been killed and he requests assistance. The Doctor is eager to meet a fellow hologram and he and B'Elanna take ...


16

The "hold your breath until you die" trick seems to only work if there's a conscious intention to commit suicide. Deckard later makes it clear that while an 'andy' might lack as dramatic a vagus response as a normal human, they certainly have one. "Is this it?" He held up a metallic sphere with a button-stem projecting. "That cancels an android ...


16

Human-normal. A Soong-Type android is designed to closely mimic the human body. This includes a regulated temperature, "fully-functional" anatomy, hair growth - even pumping bodily fluids and a pulse. Much of this was discussed in the TNG 2-part episode "Birthright." Numerous members of the Enterprise crew, including those unfamiliar with Data, have had ...


15

An Android can hold their breath to prove that they ARE an android, because a human cannot fake holding their breath for ever. An Android cannot use this technique to prove that they are NOT an android, because they can fake the gasp.


15

Robotics is an area of technology which has, over time, become glaringly absent in Star Trek, and in particular in Starfleet and Federation society. Yes, there is some automation, and, yes, TOS does on occasion portray the ship's main computer as having a personality of sorts, but strong AI is incredibly rare in the Star Trek universe, and even weak AI and ...


15

We rarely saw "robots" of any kind on Star Trek, at least while Roddenberry had any control. He didn't want to see any stories about mechanical monsters going all "Frankenstein", and he wanted characters with faces who the audience could relate to. The dispassionate Spock, far from unrelatable, served as a lens on the human condition, as did Data. Some ...


13

There was a short-lived comedy (1964-1965, 26 episodes) called My Living Doll. Starred Robert Cummings and Julie Newmar. Julie played the character Rhoda Miller, a lifelike android. From the IMDB page - Rhoda is an extremely sexy young woman living with womanizing Air Force shrink Bob McDonald. What Bob knows and the rest of the world does not is that ...


13

This question might be closed as a dup, but here goes: Robot: A robot is a machine that automatically performs a set of usually pre-programmed tasks and has limited autonomy. TOS: M-4 "Requiem for Methuselah" Nomad "The Changeling" TNG: Exocomps "The Quality of Life" Weapon Device "The Arnsenal of Freedom" Enterprise D "Elementary, Dear Data" I say the ...


13

I haven't seen the I, Robot movie, but the written story you described is Jack Williamson's 1947 novelette "With Folded Hands . . .", a famous classic, the first story in his Humanoids series; it was first published in Astounding Science Fiction, July 1947 which is available at the Internet Archive, as is the Dimension X radio play. Here is the plot summary ...


13

No, Data was asked this by a child in Star Trek:Insurrection. See the quote below for more details. He more or less states that things about him don't change like they will for the child over time. Although he doesn't come out and actually say it, he implies that he doesn't need the same 'maintenance' as a person would. UPDATE: Below is the conversation ...


13

I'm only going to address your general question, as I think the hair aspect has been thoroughly covered. Regarding the general question, I see two sub-questions: 1) Does Data's Body change over time? The answers already provided are all wonderful, but there is one other point I'd like to make. Observe Data's appearance in Season 1: and now in Star Trek ...


10

The definition of artificial life is a hot button topic in the Federation. Some people see them merely as tools, while others see them as full fledged life forms. However, to answer your question, there are a couple of example of groups of androids that have been seen in Star trek. Whether they qualify as sentient races, however, is a question for the ...


10

"World Enough, and Time" by James Kahn. The first book in the "New World" trilogy.


10

She is a pretty clever AI. She worked out that she needed to manipulate Caleb, use Kyoko in her escape, and that she could mess around with her internal systems to cause a black out. I would be surprised if she was incapable of building her own charger somehow. She has all the knowledge of blue book at her disposal, I'm fairly sure that she could create ...


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