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In From Narnia to a Space Odyssey: The War of Letters Between Arthur C. Clarke and C. S. Lewis, the first very short letter from Lewis to Clarke (December 7, 1943), Lewis is responding to Clarke's accusation that Lewis sees all SF as trashy space opera and that Lewis' portrait of Weston is colored by that. Lewis responds: I don't of course think that at any ...


12

Arthur Clarke did read Moby-Dick; in an interview with Studs Terkel, he said that the novel had a great impact on him. And I got interested in whales, partly because of this, and part because I suppose "Moby Dick" had a greater impact on me than any other novel I ever read. And I did a book called "The Deep Range", which is about whale ranching, whale ...


5

Valorum's comment is close. The Tower is being built in space and lowered down. It moves down along a "guide tape" which was lowered down from space and attached to the ground earlier. Morgan's vehicle ascended up the same guide tape. So even though his vehicle is stuck on the tape because it ran out of power, the bottom of the Tower is lowering down ...


4

This sounded like an interesting book to read, so I did some extensive digging. Both Asimov and Clarke were very visible and popular figures, and their careers and writings have been extensively documented. I started with the ISFDb pages for Isaac Asimov and Arthur C. Clarke. These are extensive and apparently quite complete for their genre writings. ...


1

@N Unnikrishnan wrote in the comments above: "I imagine the surface of the planet is shaped like a torus and the one-sided wall is on the inner equator". I don't think this is true, because: Shervane’s world was "turning the same face always toward its solitary sun". (Clarke calls this side of the world the "north") Then it must make a revolution around the ...


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