67

From the old West End Games D6 Roleplaying Game (Second Edition) supplement Death Star Technical Companion, Chapter Two: Technical Specifications, p. 16, right column: Gravity within the battle station was handled by omni-directional gravity boosters built into the decks, walls and ceilings. These gravity boosters changed orientation as easily as flipping ...


55

According to the Star Trek: Deep Space Nine - Technical Manual the rotation was driven by four factors: To control the rotation imparted by the processes of docking and undocking spaceships. To control the additional centrifugal force imparted by transferring ore from the processing centre (at the middle of the station) to docked ships at the outer pylons. ...


37

This is really more of a physics issue, see my answer on the physics stack exchange here--objects away from the ground in a rotating cylinder will still appear to be subject to gravity, their inertial paths will naturally cause them to come crashing to the inner surface of the cylinder (similarly, see this page for a short explanation of why someone jumping ...


35

Perhaps the answer is found in the following two references: In the companion volume "Firefly: Still Flying", there is a short story by series writer Jane Espenson called "What Holds Us Down" that describes the various aspects of the gravity rotor and the Honecutt Capacitors that are a part of the system for generating a relative gravity and inertia damping ...


31

I'm pretty sure this is "Noise Level" by Raymond F. Jones. http://www.sf-encyclopedia.com/entry/jones_raymond_f: "Noise Level" (December 1952 Astounding), an archetypal Astounding tale of Conceptual Breakthrough, scientific advance taking place through destruction of a previous paradigm: Scientists are told that Antigravity exists, and so proceed to ...


30

This is addressed in the TNG Technical Manual. The Enterprise has artificial gravity (of 1g) pulling the inhabitants downwards. When the ship experiences sudden unexpected movement, the ship is able to compensate to prevent the crew from fatally slamming into the walls, but there's sufficient lag in the system that still allows unpleasant lateral movement. ...


28

Because if such ships did not have artificial gravity or inertial compensators, the occupant would be reduced to chunky salsa every time the ship sped up, slowed down, or rounded a curve. This website says Yavin is 198,000 kilometers across. So going around it from the rebel base on its moon will take several minutes. This video snippet says after the X-...


23

In order to hover (approximately) in place over the surface of the rotating habitat, the helicopter does need to exert a force "upwards", i.e. towards the axis of rotation. This is because the habitat is rotating, which means that its surface is constantly moving around the axis. But the surface is also constantly being pulled towards the axis by ...


21

It is not gravitational We can be quite sure that the station is not spinning for the purpose of creating gravity, because the final scene of "What You Leave Behind" zooms out of an upper Promenade window into space, and clearly shows that the floor is oriented towards the "bottom" of the station rather than towards the outside. Spinning would not create ...


20

In TOS: The Doomsday Machine, we see a crippled, nearly destroyed USS Constellation. The gravity still works. In TNG: Booby Trap, we see a ship which has been in an energy draining environment for centuries. The gravity still works. In ENT: Broken Bow, we see Mayweather exploiting Enterprise's "sweet spot": a section of the ship where the overall gravity ...


20

As far as I remember, they never gave out that level of detail on the TV show. We're just told that Ceres has much lower gravity than Earth. In the novels that the show is based on, the gravity is artificially generated "spin" gravity, which does match the visual on the show: "down" is actually pointing out into space. Note, for example, that the airlocks (...


19

This sounds like the Giant Series by Paul Hogan. Specifically, the 2nd book in the series the Gentle Giants of Ganymede. In it, the Ganymeans (so called because their ship was first discovered on Ganymede) are a race that evolved in a world (Minerva) which did not have any predators. Hence, they never developed many of the aggressive traits of humans. ...


19

The Wiki speculates that stars are held in place magnetically. I don't believe it is ever specifically stated, but I believe that the stars are most likely held in place by the same technology that allows the Commander's Hooks to function. The Hooks allow the army commander to move freely throughout the Battle Room during practices, and also allows the ...


17

The Star Trek TNG Technical Manual (considered a canon source of info about the Star Trek Universe) contains a wealth of Treknobabble explanation regarding the presence of gravity aboard ship. In short, the technology is very similar to that of the Tractor beam; a small device buried below the deck plating emits gravitons which then attract anything ...


16

No. The objects inside the spinning wheel will experience an artificial gravity effect which appears to be pushing outwards from the center of the wheel. Since all the objects inside the station (including your bristles) already have a considerable amount of motion relative to a stationary observer outside, they will simply travel to the outside wall (e.g. ...


16

For manned craft that travel at the speeds involved in Star Wars, artificial gravity is a necessity. Small changes in direction would produce forces that would pulverize a human pilot. So if you want to have fast-moving one-man fighters in a science fiction setting, they need to have artificial gravity to cancel out the accelerational effects. From the ...


14

Artifical gravity (or better to say the feeling of gravity) in ‘Interstellar’ is generated by means of rotation (see: Wikipedia). This force is depending both on the rate of spin (rounds per minute) and the diameter. While docking at the inner part of the ship the force would be very small and near zero g. In the outer parts of the ship (where the crew ...


13

It seems that the film's Director was well aware of the issue but apparently decided to ignore it for the sake of story-telling (and presumably also for budgetary reasons). In an interview for EMPIRE, he unequivocally shows that this was a consideration; Interviewer: And is it true that you had a screening for Buzz Aldrin? Duncan Jones: Well, I gave ...


12

Apparently they have artificial gravity in the Friday 'verse. From chapter 27: I dislike the Beanstalk [the space elevator] and I don’t care much for the twenty-four hour Station. Aside from its spectacular and always changing view of Earth it has nothing to offer but high prices and cramped quarters. Its artificial gravity surges uncomfortably and ...


12

The following information about gravity generation is offered by the Force Awakens: Incredible Cross-Sections factbook Gravity on the Millenium Falcon seems to be generated by the ship's "Acceleration Compensator" (not shown) and "Auxiliary acceleration compensator" (seen below in the image from Star Wars: Incredible Cross-Sections). It's worth noting that ...


12

Partial answer: In the book the "carrousel" in Discovery is 35 feet in diameter. As it made one revolution every ten seconds, this carrousel or centrifuge produced an artificial gravity equal to that of the Moon. For the film, the book The Making of Kubrick's 2001 states that the carrousel set is 38 feet in diameter, so that's essentially the ...


11

Not directly in TNG In Conundrum, we see: Dr. Beverly Crusher tending to Kristin, a crewmember injured cliff-diving on the holodeck that holodeck program was Holodeck Program 47-C. So, although we don't observe it in TNG, we assume that in TNG the holodek could manipulate gravity with this program, otherwise Kristin would've fallen straight to the ...


11

This is an excerpt from the excellent Inside the Worlds of Star Wars Trilogy: The Ultimate Guide to the Incredible Locations of Episodes IV, V, and VI factbook. As you can see, gravity on the Death Star is generated locally. On the outermost layers of the vessel, the orientation is toward the centre. Once you go more than a few layer inside, the gravity is ...


10

The part about the ship powering up and gravity kicking in doesn't fit (as far as I recall), but the rest of the description sounds a lot like Heinlein's classic "Orphans of the Sky" (originally published in 2 parts "Universe" and "Common Sense.")


10

If I'm not mistaken the cause is that the atmosphere in the cylinder will be rotating together with the inner surface of the cylinder (due to drag). Therefore even an air-born object will still have rotational velocity since it's dragged along with the air surrounding it.


10

At least as of the TNG era, the artificial gravity system does not appear to have been designed to be modulated on the fly. According to Section 12.3: Artificial Gravity Generation of the fully canon Star Trek The Next Generation: Technical Manual by TNG production designers Michael Okuda and Rick Sternbach: The gravity field itself is created by a ...


9

The end of the first book indicates that the International Fleet salvaged and reverse engineered the technology for artificial gravity - and that the battle room(s) were a direct result of that technology. It can be inferred that the way stars are placed in the battle room is due to this technology. However, exactly how artificial gravity works in the ...


9

Is it maybe The last Deathship off Antares? It was the answer to this question, which features a similar book: Human Fleet fought the Alien Fleet and lost. (The war has been long over when the book begins) The human suvivors are put on prison ships in a prison fleet and start a voyage to some alien destiation. [100s(?) ships with 1000s(?) of ...


9

There's no technical data that I'm aware of but the show once quoted a rotation of about "60 miles an hour" which was a mistake and would only produce about 0.5g PBS Space Time did an analysis on this question: However, I think the PBS Space Time's calculations were a little off and they state that the station had a radius ...


9

If you watch the 2001 clip more carefully, you can see that most of the time, the actors are walking with a very stilted step (also mentioned in comments). Either the floor, or their shoes, are magnetized, which would be more practical than velcro for an environment that isn't carpeted. Nearly every scene in the pod bay in 2001 has them walking the same way, ...


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