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29

According to ISFDB, Terence Alfred Haile was born in Birmingham, England on the 22nd June 1921 and died in Walsall, England on the 19th January 1979. During his lifetime he published two books, "Galaxies Ahead" in 1962 and "Space Train" in 1963 (latterly republished in 1972 as "The Claw"). For a published author, there is remarkably little information ...


28

Asteroid 1134 Kepler, discovered in 1929 by Max Wolf, was named after Johannes Kepler, on the occasion of the 300th anniversary of his death, in 1930; see Lutz B. Schmadel's Dictionary of Minor Planet Names. Kepler's Somnium (The Dream) is considered by some (Asimov, Sagan) to be the first science-fiction novel. There is an English translation by Edward ...


27

I think the prime example of this is Douglas Adams. The three versions of the Hitch-Hiker's Guide to the Galaxy - radio, book, TV, and indeed four if you include the movie, which was made well after his death but based on his plans - all gleefully contradict each other. Was the Restaurant at the End of the Universe on Magrathea, or the Frogstar? Did the ...


26

I found a similar version of that "About the Author" quote here, which reads as follows: Steve Perry wrote for Batman: Ther Wars: Shadows of the Empire, and wrote the bestselling novelization of the blockb Animated Series during its first Emmy Award-winning season, authored the New York Times bestsellers Star Wars: Death Star (with Michael Reaves) and ...


23

It's pronounced Van Vote In 1994, author Isaac Walwyn met Van Vogt at a science fiction book signing event. I've quoted him directly; It was also at this time that I learned how to pronounce his name: he was telling someone that the "G" in "Vogt" was silent, making it sound identical to "vote." But by and large he did very little talking. He seemed ...


21

Yes. But not to screw with the consumers of the product. It is done to ease the creation of the character(s), either because of limitations in production, but usually due to a divergent or vastly different media environment. Other times to create economic transformation in a character or series. At first glance, I mentally answer this with a resounding no. ...


16

I am the daughter of Donald A. Wollheim and have written an extensive biographical article about him. It was published in Leigh Grossman's SENSE OF WONDER: A CENTURY OF SCIENCE FICTION. This is the article: Donald A. Wollheim: The Uncompromising Visionary My father was an extreme man: extremely intelligent, extremely well read, and with extreme opinions that ...


15

Asteroid 1931 Čapek is named after Karel Čapek, who coined the word 'robot'. The asteroid was discovered in 1969 and probably named shortly after. Also of note is Jules Verne, who's had a large impact crater on the moon named after him in 1961. Asteroid [2578 Saint-Exupéry][2578] was named after [Antoine de Saint-Exupéry][exup], writer of _Le ...


13

At the Mountains of Madness is every bit as much sci-fi as Ridley Scott's Alien is. Both stories involve travel to a remote location by means of the most advanced technology of the day. Both make some attempt at quantifying a terrible horror. Both ultimately dive deep into the horror genre. Do they cross genres? Yes. Do they exhibit clear properties of ...


12

I found this bio pretty easily, and I've taken the liberty of bolding the portions that seem especially insightful in regard to his life. (1914-1990) US editor and writer, and one of the first and most vociferous Science Fiction fans; with Forrest J Ackerman, Wollheim was perhaps the most dynamic member of the embryo Fandom of the 1930s. A lifetime resident ...


11

Warlords of Draenor involves alternate reality time-travel shenanigans. World of Warcraft has always played loosely with the lore, and Blizzard is not above retconning something if they think they can make it cooler by redoing a concept differently, sometimes yes, accidentally (see: Draenei's race origins, which creator Chris Metzen apologized for but ...


9

He wrote a third book titled "The Sports Stars In Danger", which was not science fiction. He also wrote two Westerns called "Trail's End" and "Crevice Rock". This website seems to have accurate information. It mentions a third, previously unknown, Terence Haile book titled "The Sports Stars In Danger": Terence HAILE {...


9

I am Dannie (Daniel) Plachta's niece and Leonard Plachta's daughter. You have the correct information; Dan's friend is/was Roger Zelazny and they apparently co-authored or supported each other on similar works. Probably the most popular writing of Dannie's was the Man from When. I know he had more but nothing I recall easily. I have lost touch with Dan in ...


8

Daniel "Dannie" Paul Plachta (Russian translations of his works give his name as Daniel Plektey) was born in 1935 in Michigan, USA. In the 1960s Plachta was an active participant in the Detroit fandom, participated in various science fiction conventions and co-wrote at least two pieces of short fiction with Roger Zelazny. There's a bibliography here; http://...


7

Sam Moskowitz, prominent old-time fan and historian of science fiction, wrote an essay on Philip Wylie in his Studies in Science Fiction series. Titled "Philip Wylie: The Saccharine Cynic", it was originally published in Fantastic Science Fiction Stories, September 1960, available at the Internet Archive; it was reprinted (without the subtitle) in Science ...


7

Allen Sharp is listed in various locations as Allen W. Sharp and flourished as an author in the 1970s and 1980s. At that same time, another (possibly the same) Allen W. Sharp (b.1928?) was writing books about English Literature and working at San Francisco State College as an Associate Professor of English, alongside his frequent co-author, Patricia A. ...


7

R.A. Salvatore "oversaw" the book series, acting as co-editor. Q. What can you tell us about writing the final book of R.A. Salvatore’s War of the Spider Queen? PK: It was a unique experience. Six authors and two editors worked together to create characters and a story arc that stretched across a six book series. I enjoyed the process, ...


5

Unfortunately, Barry Hughart died in August 2019. Try his publishers. They should be able to put you in touch with his estate or his agent. If they don't give you the contact info, they should at least forward your message. The most recent edition of The Chronicles of Master Li and Number Ten Ox (which collects all three novels) is from Subterranean Press, ...


5

This is Sanity by Fritz Lieber. World Manager Carrsbury runs the affairs of the world government in a future where the concept of insanity is no longer recognized, even though pretty much all of the Earth's inhabitants have a neuroses of one sort or another . . . especially in the rarified strata of government. Carrsbury, however, is perfectly sane, and ...


4

Max Brooks has repeatedly denied that he's currently writing another Zombies book, stating that he's lost interest in the genre. Are you kidding? Everybody's still trying to get me to do Space Balls 2: The Search for More Money. To be honest, I'm a shitty businessman. If I were better, I'd be on World War Z Part 7. But unfortunately, I have to write the ...


4

My research suggests that the authors of the various stories are Fred Baker, Malcolm Hulke, John Grant, David Meredith, William Hall, Sydney Bounds, George Beal and Jim Storrie. I've seen multiple sources indicating that the author of the story "The Monsters" was Malcolm Hulke, of Doctor Who fame.


4

Is it possible you're thinking of Dominick Parisien? Bio for a Kickstarter for Uncanny Magazine: Dominik Parisien is the co-editor, with Navah Wolfe, of The Starlit Wood: New Fairy Tales, which is a finalist for the Shirley Jackson and Locus Awards, and the forthcoming Robots vs Fairies. He also edited the Aurora Award-nominated Clockwork Canada: ...


4

Well, I can think of one example where in-universe canon is conflicting. I haven't played The Elder Scrolls II: Daggerfall myself, but I have read some of the lore. The interesting thing is that the player can make different decisions, resulting in different endings. Now when you play the Elder Scrolls games that come after Daggerfall, which of these ...


4

It happens all the time. Sometimes it is done for effect When Dungeons and Dragons released their Points of Light setting, they deliberately allowed various authors to contradict timelines, events, and geographies. This was done to emphasize the idea that the GM is free to change things himself; previous edition settings sometimes suffered from players ...


4

It is a fact that two of Lovecraft's greatest works were first published in science fiction magazines. At the Mountains of Madness was first published in the February, March, and April 1936 issues of Astounding Stories. "The Shadow Out of Time" was first published in the June 1936 isslue of Astounding Stories. Considering that Astounding Stories was ...


4

Lovecraft certainly wrote science fiction, some of it clearly influencing later writers. In that context, don't forget to add his "The Colour Out of Space" to the stories already mentioned above. A meteorite crashes onto New England farmland. An unidentified substance from it begins to taint the ground and the water supply and infects plants and animals (...


4

Dennis McKiernan checks most of the boxes. He's not Canadian and I have no idea of his financials, but the Mithgar series is 15 novels, one short story collection, and one short story/graphic novel (as a mass-market paperback). He has another 5-book series as well. From the Wikipedia page on him: In 1977, while riding his motorcycle, McKiernan was hit ...


4

Any chance that story is the novella "The Calvin Coolidge Home for Dead Comedians" by Bradley Denton, republished in both his collection of that name and his collection One Day Closer to Death? There's no quest for God in that story, but, quoting Wikipedia's summary, In the afterlife, Leonard finds himself confined to the Calvin Coolidge Home for Dead ...


4

This sounded like an interesting book to read, so I did some extensive digging. Both Asimov and Clarke were very visible and popular figures, and their careers and writings have been extensively documented. I started with the ISFDb pages for Isaac Asimov and Arthur C. Clarke. These are extensive and apparently quite complete for their genre writings. ...


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