Hot answers tagged

141

I've found one in-universe and one out-of-universe instance of Batman using an actual computer (e.g. as opposed to a Hollywood computer with customised graphic interface) 1960's Batman The 1960s Batman series used a modified Burroughs Corporation B205. The Batcomputer in that case was running the CTOS/BTOS Operation System. Comicbook Version - 1990s ...


133

The first fight is an ambush set up by Bane. He set the time, and the place. He knows things about Batman that Batman did not think he knew - that he is Bruce Wayne for example, off the bat (I would say that pun is unintentional, but I'd be lying). Batman is mentally thrown off. His tricks don't work: Theatricality and deception are powerful agents to the ...


100

I don't know how chivalrous Batman will turn out to be in this movie, but the Dark Knights of the past have had cause, once in a while, to take civilian passengers. Vicki Vale in Batman and Rachel Dawes in Batman Begins both got to take a ride in their respective Batmobiles after being rescued by their respective Batmen. So, even if he's not running a taxi ...


85

Because it's not only batman who works worked on the Batmobile Note that the earlier batmobile was designed by one man (Fox), built by others (Waynetech), driven by another (Wayne) and maintained by yet another man (Alfred). At a minimum there are four and potentially dozens of people who've worked on the various batmobiles, any of whom could have thought ...


82

Batman Vol.2 #17 "I HATE nothing more on this Earth than you, Joker. Nothing"


81

There are two possible uses for DNA testing that are relevant here: determining the identity of an individual who left a sample, and determining whether two different, given samples came from a single individual or two different ones. More to the point, finding the identity of someone who somehow left a sample (for example, some blood after a fight) ...


78

The answer would depend on which villain, and which universe you're speaking about. We are told that Bruce Wayne chose the image of a bat to "strike fear into the heart of his enemies". In fact, everything about his physical appearance is used to create a false image that he is more than just a man. In the movie incarnations, his body armour makes him look ...


68

Batman (Bruce Wayne) loved Rachel Dawes, so he decided to save her and left Dent for the Gotham Police Department to save. They didn't both try to save Dent; Gordon went after Dent while Wayne went after Dawes, but The Joker lied about who was located where. Dent was actually in the location The Joker told Batman Dawes was in, while Dawes was located where ...


67

Batman does wear armor. His costume over the continuities has always been some variation of Kevlar, Nomex or other bullet-proof, fireproof, frost resistant, cloth or light plate armor worn under his costume or woven into the costume itself. He has pointed out that the bat symbol on his chest is to make his chest an easier and more inviting target to ...


66

No there isn't, and that was an explicit choice by Christopher Nolan given Heath Ledger's death. Nolan says that "We're not addressing The Joker at all. That is something I felt very strongly about in terms of my relationship with Heath and the experience I went through with him on The Dark Knight". He added that "I didn't want to in any way try and ...


66

As recorded in knowyourmeme.com: According to the Comics Should Be Good Archive, the panel originated from the 1965 comic book “World’s Finest #153.” The story is based around an alternate reality in which Batman believes that Superboy and Superman are responsible for the death of his father.


64

Robin isn't just wearing underwear, he is wearing a leotard. Dick was part of a circus and his mum and dad were the trapeze act which he was also training in. After his mum and dad are killed in their act because of local mobster Tony Zucco taking revenge on the circus owner, Batman finds Dick. Dick convinces him to let him help and becomes Robin the Boy ...


63

The Joker knows that Batman will not kill him, and that the current court and prison system in Gotham is too corrupt for the Joker to be properly judged and jailed. In The Dark Knight, the Joker expresses this: You have nothing, nothing to threaten me with. Nothing to do with all your strength. Batman will never kill the Joker as it goes against what ...


61

Yes In the Red Son universe (Earth 30), the soviet Batman fought against Superman using Red Sun lamps, weakening Superman enough for him to beat him up. However Wonder Woman, who was used as bait, was convinced by Superman to destroy the generator powering the lamps, which lead to Superman's powers returning and Batman killing himself (as this Superman ...


61

Yes. There was an original series episode where the Joker is in Wayne Manor and Batman and Robin need to go from the cave back up the Batpoles. They used a compressed steam lift under the pads to push them back up.


60

The schoolboy is something of an affectionate (or not-so-affectionate, in this case) term for Superman. More fully called "The big blue schoolboy" elsewhere in the series. Superman's also often called variations on "Boy Scout," and other similar terms, for his tendency to always follow the rules (in the case of the Dark Knight Returns, even where the rules ...


59

The Bat-train appears in Batman Vol.1 #95 It's a standard locomotive of its era and had five passenger cars as well as two flat-cars for storing the batplane and batmobile. There would be comfortable space for 450 passengers seated and standing or you could crush-load over two thousand passengers if you removed the seating. We're introduced to the Bat-...


55

TL;DR: Throughout the trilogy, Bruce always uses his gravelly voice while in costume, regardless of who he is interacting with. The circumstances don't seem to make any difference. He might be in the Batcave with Alfred, where no one else can possibly hear him; he'll still speak that way. He might be telling someone who he really is; he'll do it in the ...


52

The other answer, by Mario, is close, but not quite on. It's wanting to deny responsibility for one's actions. I saw this all the time when I worked in treatment. The teens I worked with would do something blatantly illegal and then blame the cops for catching them. While I was teaching, so the counseling end wasn't directly my job, I was still supposed ...


50

Every superhero began from somewhere. Batman had his origins in Gotham because it was a city that needed a symbol, a savior who selflessly acted right no matter what. Superman began from Metropolis that way, etc. But when you look at DC heroes from the context of Justice League, you see that they leave and save the planet from bigger problems. Batman too ...


49

Yes, in the very first episode When approving some Wayne Foundation spending, Bruce remarks: Bruce: My resources are behind you... in full. Harris: You're a real champion, Mr. Wayne. Female visitor: Indeed you are. Bruce: Don't mention it, Mr. Harris. Perhaps if there had been anti-crime centers of the type you now propose when my parents ...


47

You're most likely describing this scene from Batman: Whatever Happened to the Caped Crusader?. Alfred isn't really The Joker, he's merely pretending to be him.


45

Detective Comics Vol 1 #38 (1940) seems to be the first time that he needs to introduce himself (to Robin, incidentally). Prior to that, everyone just seems to know who he is.


45

By popular demand, I am reposting my comment as an answer. Just to clarify, this footage is not the finished product, so don't expect to see this sign to appear in an official release. It will most likely be digitally erased in post-production. You would not see this any more than you would see the wires that hold up the stunt men in an elaborate fight ...


44

The second theory seems to be the case. In the complete page (provided in this reddit post), you can see that he used it to swing down on a clown when his hands were tied, also referenced in this chronology as "Batman defeats Mad Clown, keeps thong as trophy (fb from Batman #83, Part 1)". It appears in Batman #83, from April 1954 (although this picture ...


44

Batman is never mentioned by name in the novel, but it is extremely likely that he and all other "famous" comic book characters are comic book characters in-universe, if they exist at all. From the in-universe memoir "Under The Hood", Hollis Mason says the following about his decision to become the first masked hero: For me it all started in 1938, the ...


43

Bane is mentioned as having been excommunicated from the League of Shadows in the movie, so presumably had access to their knowledge. It's not linked explicitly in the movie, but I therefore assume that the knowledge that Bruce Wayne was Batman would have come from this link. After all, Ra's al Ghul definitely knew Bruce Wayne was Batman in Batman Begins.


43

Joker's whole idea was to turn Harvey into a monster, NOT into a martyr. AND to hurt Batman personally (probably turning him into a monster). Both goals would be undermined if Batman saved Rachel and let Harvey die. So he likely did the misdirection intentionally; counting on Batman to put more of an effort to save his "girlfriend" (who ends up being Harvey)...


43

The original, Golden Age version of Catwoman (1940-1977) has been repeatedly sent to prison by Batman, escaping each time, and eventually reforming, marrying Bruce Wayne, and bearing their daughter. There was no confinement to Arkham: indeed, Arkham debuted in 1974, well after most of this version of Catwoman's stories had been told. I can find no indication ...


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